My Name Is Nobody / Il mio nome è Nessuno (Tonino Valerii, Sergio Leone, 1973)


(Stanton) #241

Something to Do with Death p. 292-93

He also describes the cut scenes in the appendix of his SWs book.

The barber shop scenes belongs to those which definitely were filmed, some others were deleted before they were shot.


(Chris_Casey) #242

Thanks, Stanton.
With all this information…and closer scrutiny of that picture on the left.
I agree that it is from the deleted barber shop scene of OUATIW.
I notice that Fonda’s make-up and hair are slightly different (mostly darker)…and it is more the way he looked in OUATIW than his look in MY NAME IS NOBODY.


(Novecento) #243

Yup, it has to be from OUATITW. By the way there is a better version of the MNIN pic here: http://www.clipscorner.net/cinema/tonino-valerii-il-mio-nome-nessuno-di-roberto-curti.html

Regarding the direction of the scene, I am still standing by my opinion that I posted on the Sergio Leone webboard a while back:

I have a solution...

Valerii says the following in De Fornari on page 158: “The 9 weeks of shooting in the US went as smooth as silk if you ignore some friction between me and the cameraman, Nannuzzi, who tried to influence the directing without having the ability”.

It seems to me that Leone gave Nannuzzi explicit instructions on how he wanted the beginning scene (which was the first to be done) shot. This then explains why Leone was then able to later claim, albeit tenuously, that he had a hand in the directing of this scene in spite of not actually being there.


(Novecento) #244

Could an Italian speaker kindly translate the following for me (principally the section in quotes) - it’s from Giusti’s Dizionario del western all’italiana:

Secondo Rik Battaglia, amico storico di Leone, Tonino Valerii aveva fatto scrivere sul contratto che Leone non fosse presente quando lui girava. Lo avrebbe imbarazzato. «Ma quando vide il girato, e lo vide molto presto, disse: “Questo gira come pensa che girerei io, ma io non girerei così”. E allora il film lo prese in mano lui. Si era allarmato molto. Magari lo ha lasciato girare un altro po’, ma poi gli ha detto basta.»


(Novecento) #245

Courtesy of Leonardo at the SLWB if anyone is interested:

“According to Rick Battaglia, an old time Leone friend, Tonino Valerii asked for a clause in his contract stating that Leone should not be present while he was directing. He would have been embarassed by his presence. But once (Leone) saw what had been shot sofar, and he saw it quite soon, he said “This guy shoots like he thinks I would shoot the movie, but in fact this is not how I would shoot it.” So he (Leone) took over the movie. He was very alarmed. He may have left a few more sequences for Valerii to shoot, but then he said enough”


(Stanton) #246

Ha ha, now if that is true then we must assume that Leone probably really shot most of the film himself. Which would on the other hand be in accordance with Neil Summers’ observations on the set.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #247

Which also implies that for those who didn’t like the film, they have only Leone to blame!


(Mickey13) #248

I always loved this movie. It always feels like Leone to me, during every viewing. :slight_smile:


(Stanton) #249

Of course!

Who else?


(Novecento) #250

Received this in the mail recently:

There’s a great chapter on who claims who directed what in My Name is Nobody. Unfortunately I don’t speak Italian so can only piece together what it says from my knowledge of some other Romance languages :-\


(scherpschutter) #251

[quote=“Novecento, post:250, topic:71”]Received this in the mail recently:

There’s a great chapter on who claims who directed what in My Name is Nobody. Unfortunately I don’t speak Italian so can only piece together what it says from my knowledge of some other Romance languages :-[/quote]

Can’t you scan those pages?


(Mickey13) #252

Maybe we’ll finally find out who directed this movie. :slight_smile:


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #253

I never knew there was a book about this film!


(Yodlaf Peterson) #254

Arrived today. :smiley:


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #255

Cool I love steelbook. Hows the picture on that Yod compared with previous dvds and other blu rays?


(Novecento) #256

Are the subs locked?


(Yodlaf Peterson) #257

I watched the French disc the other day, the subs are indeed forced when watching the film in English (can’t remove them via the remote either). Film itself has a really nice looking transfer though.

Besides, I’m used to foreign subs the amount of stuff I’ve watched on import tapes over the years.


(Richard--W) #258

Technical virtuosity and the presence of Henry Fonda cannot compensate for an idea so stupid it stinks like horse manure in the heat, and a star with a mousey voice whose one facial expression looks as if he’s got worms or something. This film did the spaghetti western no favors.

It’s impossible to enjoy self-ridicule and parody. It’s not funny and if Sergio Leone thought he was being profound he needed to think again. Fonda should have talked Leone out of this one even if it meant slapping him upside the head.

1 star because there’s no option for sub-zero.


(Novecento) #259

There are some beautifully shot scenes in this. That urinal scene is so well shot that it’s kind of funny when you compare it the actual content of the scene.


(Novecento) #260
... the subs are indeed forced when watching the film in English (can't remove them via the remote either).

It’s so annoying when they do that.

Occasionally you get lucky and they are removable. I recently purchased the French BD of Sam Peckinpah’s “The Killer Elite” and they were removable on that once the feature was playing.