Once Upon a Time in the West / C’era una volta il West (Sergio Leone, 1968)


(Bill san Antonio) #541

Haven’t noticed that before. But knowing how keen Leone was about details I guess it’s there on purpose.


#542

Unlucky 13…?


#543

Finally finished marathoning my top 20 by watching West for the umpteenth time. Still the greatest film ever made in my humble, by a fair margin too.


#544

I’m due a re-watch very soon.

It is rather quite very excellent.


(Casey) #545

My favorite moment:

“Who are you?”


#546

I think every scene is spectacular in one way or another. I can’t really pick a favourite because every moment is as good as the last.


(Sebastian) #547

The movie is turning 50 next year


(Novecento) #548

Probably the greatest film ever made IMO


#549

Someone once said every shot in the film could be used as a painting. So true.


(Casey) #550

Agreed.


#551

Revisited this minor classic this morning,

Safe to say I still love every second and it holds up tremendously well. The flashback is still the best use of a flashback I’ve seen in a film.

My recent revisit of the GBU on the other hand… whoops. Nowhere near as good. Even the shorter version.


#552

That would be cool to see!


(Sebastian) #553

The what journal? :wink:


#554

Claudia Cardinale dubbed herself in English? Leone’s Stalingrad? Wasn’t it going to be Leningrad?


(Novecento) #555

.Also Leone produced two Westerns (Nobody and Genius)…


(Nick) #556

Hey, thought you guy’s might enjoy some of artist Frank McCarthy’s art draft’s for Once Upon A Time In The West’s poster.

They’re really large files, open em up to get a better view.

The Final Versions:


#557

I always assumed the portraits of the 4 main stars and the low angle shootout image were by different artists.
The portraits, to be honest are a little amateurish, or at least unrefined or unfinished (wonky eyes etc)
The low angle paintings are in a different league … fabulous work.
Thanks for posting these.


(Nick) #558

Frank McCarthy was in a league of his own when it came to movement and perspective. He truly created some of the best film posters I’ve ever seen, and it’s a shame he decided to leave it all behind after the mid 70’s.

Also McCarthy might not have had good references for the portraits, as his countless other portraits are all of exsquisite quality.

He was responsible for everybodies favorite Day of Anger poster as well.