Minnesota Clay (Sergio Corbucci, 1964)


(Stanton) #222

Yes, but that might be a trimmed shot, and maybe originally there was a much longer pull-back.

I still think that this scene was shot for a dying Clay.


(scherpschutter) #223

Looks like it, yes. But Corbucci was a man of many ideas, often contrary ideas. In Django he first wanted this, than that, today mud, tomorrow snow. And he ran away from an unfinished Johnny Oro because he couldn’t wait to start with Django. He often reworked entire scripts on the set and than changed his ideas again in the last minute. So both endings could be ‘original’: the scene you’re referring to was shot for a dying Clay, but Corbucci wasn’t sure, he had not yet completely made up his mind and therefore wanted to try an alternative ending with a surviving Clay as well. The last shot is beautiful, and the entire scene with Clay shooting holes in the glasses, is a genuine Corbucci idea, ridiculous of course, but he was one of those directors who could make ridiculous ideas work. Like I said in my review: I like both endings, they both work for me.

mp4_000608480


(autephex) #224

I read them, it doesn’t really mean anything. If the producer forced an ending, this decision could have been made at any point, including well before the ending was ever shot… it doesn’t mean that Corbucci didn’t have an ending in mind before shooting the scene


(autephex) #225

Also this relates to the above points about shot abruptness, since Corbucci may have also changed his mind after the shoot…

Yes the holy glasses are wonderful, but this aside, not sure why anyone would think the happy ending would be Corbucci’s choice. Perhaps after seeing how stupid it was, he then changed his mind, not recognizing it at first :stuck_out_tongue:


(Novecento) #226

Sure, but you are nonetheless basing your suggestion on the Sergio Corbucci that later came to be known for such things rather than the Sergio Corbucci at the time of shooting (that doesn’t mean to say he didn’t have it in him at an earlier stage, but just that your perspective is different).

Don’t get me wrong, I see arguments on both sides. I just need to see if I can find him having said anything anywhere about it. Although that in itself is weird because if he had wanted a different ending he probably would have been more vocal about it…


(autephex) #227

True, and I’m not trying to say anything for sure of course.

My opinion is more based on the fact that the happy ending just isn’t very good, aside from the glasses. While that last shot is excellent, the ending itself is rather bad, happiness aside. So it would make sense to me that he would instead want the other.


(Stanton) #228

But putting it this way you can also easily defend the alternative TGS ending … :wink:

Minnesota Clay is not a western which needs a bad ending, a happy one would be just fine for me, but if the black Sergio wanted himself a good ending, why not directing a more convincing one? And not one which bears the risk to turn the whole film into a joke.

Nahh, as I said before, this ending smells very much like a producer’s idea, which Corbcci then turned into that joke, like he did with that TGS ending.

Btw what do you guys think about the I crudeli ending? Is that a premature ending, prematurely cut to suggest that both leads are not dying?

It’s a shame that there are not more interviews which could shed some light on Corbucci’s intentions and preferences. This semi autographic book by his widow would probably tell a lot.


(scherpschutter) #229

Not really, we have more info about how things went in the case of The Great Silence.
I’m btw not defending anything (other than that the happy ending works for me as well as the unhappy one), just trying to said what could have happened. I have been looking and asking people who possibly knew more but haven’t been able to find any conclusive evidence on the subject.


(scherpschutter) #230

Could be, I always had the idea there was something wrong with the ending. Something seems to be missing and it’s to brief and also to ‘normal’ compared to the long, bloody opening massacre. But I should rewatch the entire movie to say anything conclusive about this