Johnny Yuma (Romolo Guerrieri, 1966)


(Romaine Fielding) #41

Even the bad ones are good ones (mostly!)

I du thet al thu tim to :slight_smile:


(Silver) #42

[quote=“Romaine Fielding, post:39, topic:610”]Haha. That’s why I liked Mark Damon in this. He was not so irritating to me. I liked his jokey manner (as exeplified by the “sale” of his horse to Saturno Cerra at the start).
Rosabla Neri’s role is my favorite by her in a Spaghetti. I loved her parrot and her bitchslappin’

I loved her sadistic brother with those incongurous bat-wing chaps.

Even with your criticisms you still gave this a 8 out of 10. The mark of a classic!
“Johnny Yuma don’t goooo…”[/quote]

Same goes for me. I can find Damon annoying at times (and that book of his shows just what a pompous ass he really is!) but it works for this film. Rosalba Neri is excellent…don’t think anyone else could have pulled that part off as well…and that parrot scene is absloutely priceless. Good film also for the fact that the hired “villain” is a much better drawn character than many of his ilk, and at the end of the day, is more honourable than villainous. Have to agree about the Mexican sidekick though…he was annoying, and the film wouldn’t have lost anything if he wasn’t in it. Anyway…i love this one, it’s a shame it’s not better known really.

Same here…even in the bad ones, i can usually find something that appeals to me…


(ENNIOO) #43

I am going to have the theme song in my head now…


(El Topo) #44

Were I am back in Spaghetti hell and in full style with this very good exemple of our beloved genre.

On the acting departing I quite satisfied with Mark Hammon a bit on the ham side sometimes but never too much never reaching that point ewhere it becames laughable, the latin look made him perfect for spaghetti, Lawrence Dobkin didn’t recognize him could be just another Italian actor, but the face somehow looked familiar, a quick check at IMDB and foun the reason why the man looked familiar, he made is career mostly in US TVland so, he’s also pretty good in the film very professional actor, my guess is that after Eastwood success the idea of traveling to Almeria or Rome wasn’t such a bad choice ( like it used to be) for an American actor, even more if he did mostly TV work who knows some got their best exits that way (LuKe Askew for isntance), Neri does really act besides looking lovely as the femme fatale, and character actor Fidel Gonzalezz is very underrated is always good in the films I’ve seen of him.
Also the director made something that is not always easy in this midle of the road films, he was able to create a very well balanced film, of course the plot is the usual stuff but we got some points that should be taken as very positive, first the main characters got some real deep even the female one, also the the two pistoleros relation in the film is very well done, but for me the most positive piont cause the most hard to accomplish is the very good balance between the comic moments with the most dramatic ones is just perfect. The final showdown is also pretty well resolved in my view, and I also liked the ending althought a even more desertic landscape would have done the trick better.
As you can see I really liked this one, of course not the kind of film that could be there among the top dogs of the genre but hey if all the average stuff was like this I would be a happy men, and man in this film they beat a child to death so spags are really brutal and no cgi guts coming out the belly need for that. Other thing that I liked is the very Spanish feeling of the film (and this coming from a Portuguese guy lol, like a Scottish …well never mind), but hell theres a lot of nuestros hermanos in the film, the torture scene, the scenario even Neri looked like a Spanish Senorita. It deserved a sequel I’ll that much.

4 stars in my Topo scale


(Hoover Valentine) #45

This is for Pepe!! ;D


(pedro james) #46

I agree with EL TOPO this is not the best spaghetti western in the world but the account you gave is pretty good…I,ve actually got this film in my top 30 so maybe i,m the weak link in the western trail…AND hey SARTANA 1968 maybe you dropped off for a couple of mins with your finger on the fast forward …or maybe you missed some of the good stuff with your finger on the dvd trigger lol :)… For me i would rather watch this one than ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST and that statement will really stir up the hornets nest but its true for me…


(pedro james) #47

HEY THERE AMIGO,DONT HIT THE SNOOZE BUTTON TO MANY TIMES AS YOU MAY MISS THE LAST TRAIN TO SAN FERNANDO…GOOD LUCK


(ION BRITTON) #48

It ain’t a masterpiece, but come on, 0 stars? I saw I have given it 3 stars. Guerrieri has done a pretty good job and the score is quite memorable. Not in my top-20, surely in my top-40 though.


(JonathanCorbett) #49

This uneven but good SW released in August 1966, a month later the less satisfactory Johnny Oro/Ringo and His Golden Pistol, seems to me rather influential: the character played by Rosalba Neri has obvious similarities with the equally interesting ones that we see in La resa dei conti/The Big Gundown and Il momento di uccidere/The Moment to Kill, the duel that leads to something different is reproposed in many subsequent Italian-style westerns (for instance Da uomo a uomo/Death Rides a Horse, Vado… l’ammazzo e torno/Any Gun Can Play, Vamos a Matar Companeros and Gli fumavano le Colt… lo chiamavano Camposanto/They Call Him Cemetery) and the initial letter sequence reminds unequivocally of a similar situation in Road to Perdition (2002), no less.


(tomas) #50

i almost fell asleep during this flick - very boring to me - somehow it couldn´t draw me into the story and that hero, hm, hm, hm


(Chris_Casey) #51

Still a Top 10 film for me. Perhaps that is because it was the very first Spaghetti Western I saw when I was a kid.
I saw this one even before I saw the Leone films.


(chuck connors brother) #52

I love some scenes in Johnny Yuma but I much preferred Johnny Oro… I had a similar experience as tomas the 2nd time I watched this one.


(John Welles) #53

I have just seen Johnny Yuma (1966) and enjoyed the hell out of it. It’s not perfect, there is an un-sureness in tone resulting in the stereotypical Mexican sidekick, annoying and useless, and is the film’s’ major problem, Mark Damon’s titular character. He is an arrogant, smirking, son-of-a-gun that makes him hard to root for. Damon isn’t a good enough actor to pull off the role. The director, Guerrieri, needed someone like Giuliano Gemma, who worked wonders with a similar character in the same year’s Arizona Colt. Still, the ploting’s good, with a great femme fatale in Rosalba Neri as the scheming villainess of the film. Laurence Dobkin is great and in another film would’ve been a good main character. It is very well directed by Romolo Guerrieri, who has his cinematographer Mario Capriotti in a very fluid, constantly moving style. The action is well done, apart from an overlong bar brawl that seems like a cut scene from Enzo G. Castellari’s Any Gun Can Play (a film Guerrieri worked on in the script department), and the final shoot-out looks very, very nice with the village building’s all in white and is handled excitingly. A few flaws prevent this from being a top-notch Spaghetti Western; instead it settles as just a really fun example of what the genre was doing and could do during its Golden Years of the latter half of the sixties.


(scherpschutter) #54

HERE COMES JOHNNY …

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(Jonny Powers) #55

I remember watching this for the first time, one of the first I saw after the Leone films. Had it on the 44 Mill Creek pack, watched it after I did The Grand Duel and Death Rides A Horse, I believe. Real surprised at the stark differences, shut it off after about fifteen minutes cause I couldn’t quite get into it. The theme was stuck in my head though for about a month before I went and, after doing some reading and realizing this was an influential early one, I put it back in along with Arizona Colt. I think understanding the backstory and the history opened it up into a new light for me, cause I really enjoyed it when I watched it again.


(scherpschutter) #56

@Jonny | The problem is that it takes some time to get going; the first forty minutes or so are rather tame (and we also get this stupid barroom brawl), the second half of the movie is much better. And this parrot scene is almost as funny as Monty Python’s parrot sketch.


(Jonny Powers) #57

Haha! Yeah, that’s true. I’ve never really minded the brawl, not as bad going through the second time around.


(Phil H) #58

Always enjoyed this one a lot and it stands up to repeated viewings. In my opinion Guerrieri is one of the most under rated directors in 60s Italian cinema.

As for the parrot thing, I have often thought I should write something on the repeated use of this bird in Spaghetti Westerns. I talked about it to the Rev earlier this year when we were in Luton and still moderately sober. They crop up again and again and the main reason I haven’t written said article is I still don’t have any real theory as to why. Any psycho-Analytical theories Scherp? They do often seem to be linked in some way to sexuality although, again, I have no idea why.

Perhaps I’ll start a thread to begin with to get examples out there and a discussion going. Who knows what late night drunken ramblings might illuminate the issue.


(scherpschutter) #59
Always enjoyed this one a lot and it stands up to repeated viewings. In my opinion Guerrieri is one of the most under rated directors in 60s Italian cinema.

As for the parrot thing, I have often thought I should write something on the repeated use of this bird in Spaghetti Westerns. I talked about it to the Rev earlier this year when we were in Luton and still moderately sober. They crop up again and again and the main reason I haven’t written said article is I still don’t have any real theory as to why. Any psycho-Analytical theories Scherp? They do often seem to be linked in some way to sexuality although, again, I have no idea why.

Perhaps I’ll start a thread to begin with to get examples out there and a discussion going. Who knows what late night drunken ramblings might illuminate the issue.

I haven’t got the slightest idea. Never heard parrots were symbols of fertility or anything, I’ll try to find out. Might have been a joke among colleagues, though.


(Reza) #60

Was not what i expected…it was great @