Guns for San Sebastian / La Bataille de San Sebastian (Henri Verneuil, 1968)


(Bad Lieutenant) #21

Of course they say they’re legit. And of course they’re not legit.
Amataeruish website that offers a Guns for San Sebastian dvd that can be bought nowhere else. If there were such a release it would be on Amazon, eBay etc. as well.

Full cover is a simple ms paint job:

Couldn’t find a bigger one as it had been deleted from Photobucket. This one from Google images cache.


(Novecento) #22

I hadn’t noticed the cover was in Portuguese ;D

Seems like there may have been a Brazilian DVD release of this with English audio which may be what they are selling.

Here’s what the website says:

“Film copyrights: All the films in our catalog are supplied as original region 2 or region 0 dvds. There are a few films we can supply on dvd-r format where we have obtained permission from the existing copyright holder. We are currently updating our catalog to comply with FACT and BBFC regulations. In all cases where you see a title for sale unavailable elsewhere it is either in the public domain (where copyright ownership no longer applies) or we have been granted permission by a principal copyright holder.”

I’ll wait and see if they reply to my e-mail, but yes I am sceptical too.


(ENNIOO) #23

The TCM T.V print ( the 2.35 one ) is not bad quality.


(Hired Peon) #24

Does MGM still hold the rights in the US? Do they have a DVD-on-demand service like the other studios?

I enjoyed the film very much and would love to have a good quality copy.


(El Topo) #25

I have a Portuguese edition from Cinedigital, which its the same as the Spanish but without the spanish dub of course for us its in english with Portuguese subs, pretty good quality.


(Novecento) #26

Is it this one: http://www.cinedigital.com/pt/title?id=10220081 ?

It seems like the language options are French and Spanish with Portuguese subs.


(El Topo) #27

[quote=“Novecento, post:26, topic:1107”]Is it this one: http://www.cinedigital.com/pt/title?id=10220081 ?

It seems like the language options are French and Spanish with Portuguese subs.[/quote]

Yes Novecento no English I’m afraid, just checked it out, I’m so use to have English, that I forgot that this DvD in particular was in French and Spanish (like the Spanish DVD), sorry for the wrong intel.


(Novecento) #28

Thanks for that. I’m assuming this is an official release?


(Novecento) #29

Any spare copies of that lying around Ennioo ???


(ENNIOO) #30

Sure have, drop me a p.m if you want.


(El Topo) #31

Yes it is.


(Novecento) #32

They replied to my e-mail:

As I say I have not watched it but I expect it would be good quality. As for distribution rights, we don't have them, but we are not manufacturing this product, we are just importing and reselling. I don't believe there is a genuine release of this yet, unless you can find a Spanish or Korean import (where the rights may have been overlooked anyway) so I am not sure we can help you.

Seems you were right Bad Lieutenant!

Thanks Ennioo :smiley:


(Novecento) #33

Thanks to a rather nice forum member ::), I was able to watch the TCM TV print of this. The quality was not brilliant, but was widescreen and not too pixelly on my 37" LCD screen.

Set in 1746, the term “Zapata Western” is a bit of a misnomer for this one as it would be another 130 years before Zapata would even be born in 1879. Even in terms of style, this is more like a precursor to Roland Joffé’s “The Mission”, released almost 20 years later in 1986 also with an excellent Morricone score, than a Spaghetti Western. As a Franco-Italo-Mexican production, even the term Euro-Western is rather loose.

Although greater use could perhaps have been made of the authentic Mexican backdrop and Morricone’s truly incredible score, and the complex relationship between the ruling aristocracy, colonial settlers and indigenous populations could have been further developed, the film is nonetheless a real gem. Given the quality of the film and the presence of Anthony Quinn and Charles Bronson, it is astonishing that there is no official DVD release with original English audio. There apparently exists a 10 minute documentary on the shooting of the film called “San Sebastian 1746 in 1968” which would certainly make a very nice extra feature.

I might have to give my top-20 another re-jiggle ???


(Stanton) #34

Well, it’s not a SW. I’m surprised that you like it that much.


(Novecento) #35

;D After my wife took me to see the Cannes award winning Thai movie “Uncle Boonme” last week, I think anything would have seemed good to me! It was so bad that we actually left before it ended. Zero out of ten, no joke!

As for “Guns for San Sebastian”, it would only be vying for one of the lower spots on my top-20 if at all. I was quite simply pleasantly surprised by such high production values and a plot that, albeit under-developed, had some real depth. From what you’re saying, it wouldn’t qualify in any case as it is not an SW?


(Stanton) #36

There was of course a small Italian involvement on the production side, and for some people that would be enough reason to call it a SW.

But at first it doesn’t look and it doesn’t smell like a SW. And it is mainly a French film shot by a French director in Mexico.
SW are made by Italian or Spanish directors, and if not they should at least look like a SW, and for that Cemetery Without Crosses is in every respect a SW. And a few others made by e.g Americans (like Sledge) too.

Again a matter of definitions. I would prefer it not to have votes for it for our Top 20, but if someone does, it is in. Just like a few other border crossers which are already in.


(korano) #37

I’d keep it here if the discussion ever came up. But it does feel really Western hemishpere.


(Stanton) #38

Verneuil was a competent director, but in the end most of his films which I have seen are not really exciting.

And San Sebastian also doesn’t really come off from the ground. Quinn gives everything he have in his then typical Alexis Zorba style, and some say it’s too much for the film, while Bronson remains pale. The special effects of the breaking dam flood look pretty bad (the cheapest modern CGI would have looked better).

I have read the Morricone soundtrack should sound similar to the Il Mercenario one, but I don’t remember anything similar in it.

Not more than 5/10


(Novecento) #39

[quote=“Stanton, post:38, topic:1107”]Verneuil was a competent director, but in the end most of his films which I have seen are not really exciting.

And San Sebastian also doesn’t really come off from the ground. Quinn gives everything he have in his then typical Alexis Zorba style, and some say it’s too much for the film, while Bronson remains pale. The special effects of the breaking dam flood look pretty bad (the cheapest modern CGI would have looked better).

I have read the Morricone soundtrack should sound similar to the Il Mercenario one, but I don’t remember anything similar in it.

Not more than 5/10[/quote]

Ouch, harsh rating Stanton! I’d rate it much higher than that. As for Morricone’s score, it’s quite possibly one of his best regardless of any similarities to The Mercenary or not.


(Stanton) #40

As I said, I have no clue why you rate it that high …