Go with God, Gringo / Vayas con Dios, gringo (Edoardo Mulargia, 1966)


(The Stranger) #1

I do not know the film. Unfortunately.
But your opinion would interest me.
Is the film worth a look?
Stanton has been writing on the database a very positive comment.
Another unknown masterpiece by Mulargia ?


(Stanton) #2

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Vayas_con_Dios,_gringo

For the greater part this is indeed a very remarkable film.


(Silence) #3

Never heard of before, great poster artwork!


(ENNIOO) #4

You do surprise me Silence.


(Silence) #5

I had heard the title but knew nothing about the film.


(scherpschutter) #6

I don’t even understand the title

My Spanish isn’t anything to write home about, but I don’t think vayas is correct


(Stanton) #7

Well, it’s the Italian title, while the Spanish title is actually Vete con Dios, Gringo.


(scherpschutter) #8

Vete is correct, as far as I know

Vayas con Dios is no Italian (in Italian this would be ‘Va con Dio’), I guess it was made up by an Italian who thought he knew Spanish. (A sort of Van Gaal German, so to speak)


(El Topo) #9

Well if what their trying to sya its:
GO WITH GOD

SPANISH - Vaya con Dios or Vete con Dios

Both ways are correct I do not Know what’s the diference between them.


(scherpschutter) #10

[quote=“El Topo, post:9, topic:2378”]Well if what their trying to sya its:
GO WITH GOD

SPANISH - Vaya con Dios or Vete con Dios

Both ways are correct I do not Know what’s the diference between them.[/quote]

They are imperatives of different verbs, if I’m not mistaken (as said I’m not an expert in Spanish):

Vaya from the verb ir

Vete from the verb andarse

I guess you have similar verbs in Portuguese, the pairing exists in all Latin languages:

French: Aller and S’en aller
Ialian: Andare and Andarsene

The meaning of those verbs is in all cases very close


(Stanton) #11

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:8, topic:2378”]Vete is correct, as far as I know

Vayas con Dios is no Italian (in Italian this would be ‘Va con Dio’), I guess it was made up by an Italian who thought he knew Spanish. (A sort of Van Gaal German, so to speak)[/quote]

Of course it is not Italian.

And we call it Trapdeutsch, honoring by this the great Trapatoni, who redefined the German language and really became a cult figure among the linguists. Trapatoni was more influential than the last German spelling reform.

But still I’m wondering, why didn’t they simply “translate” it in Spain with vaya instead of vete?


(El Topo) #12

Andarse means something like go away, vanish, if you know what I mean.
Vaya con dios will mean go with with god, in a good way

So I guess that Vete con Dios will mean go off with God, or desappear from here or something like that.


(Phil H) #13

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:10, topic:2378”]They are imperatives of different verbs, if I’m not mistaken (as said I’m not an expert in Spanish):

Vaya from the verb ir

Vete from the verb andarse[/quote]

I’m afraid you are mistaken Scherp. Wow, I never thought I’d be correcting you on a matter of language :o

Vete is the familiar you (tu) imperative form of the verb irse which is, as I think Topo mentioned, to go away.
Vaya is the imperative form of ir (to go) in the third person singular or polite (usted) form of you.
Vayas is the present subjunctive of ir in the familiar form. Or, in the negative, can also be in the imperative. So for example. “Go with God” (in the polite form) would be Vaya con Dios. “Don’t go with God” (in the familiar form) would be No vayas con Dios. But Vayas in the imperative can only be used in the negative so either way, Vayas con Dios is incorrect grammar.
Hope that’s all clear ;D

Now I just need Julio Alberto to come on and tell me I’m talking rubbish.


(scherpschutter) #14

[quote=“Phil H, post:13, topic:2378”]I’m afraid you are mistaken Scherp. Wow, I never thought I’d be correcting you on a matter of language :o

Vete is the familiar you (tu) imperative form of the verb irse which is, as I think Topo mentioned, to go away.
Vaya is the imperative form of ir (to go) in the third person singular or polite (usted) form of you.
Vayas is the present subjunctive of ir in the familiar form. Or, in the negative, can also be in the imperative. So for example. “Go with God” (in the polite form) would be Vaya con Dios. “Don’t go with God” (in the familiar form) would be No vayas con Dios. But Vayas in the imperative can only be used in the negative so either way, Vayas con Dios is incorrect grammar.
Hope that’s all clear ;D

Now I just need Julio Alberto to come on and tell me I’m talking rubbish.[/quote]

Gracias señor !

I was never a happy marriage, Spanish and me …

(Makes me think, by the way, of one of my favourite TV series, Dad’s Army. Captain Mainwaring (I’ve got some highly trained men here!) and Sergeant Wilson were my favourites. When Mainwaring made a mistake, and was corrected by Wilson, he inevitably would say : “Okay Wilson, I was only testing you.”)

So: Okay, Hardcastle, I was only testing you …


(Bill san Antonio) #15

I think this incorrect grammar is just here in database. Imdb and other sites use the correct title.


(Phil H) #16

I think you’re right Bill.

Vete con Dios can still be correct, Stanton.
Again, it is just a matter of using the tu form of irse. I am more familiar with the term Vaya con Dios but I have seen Vete used in the past in the same context. I’ve often wondered if it was a regional variation thing. Maybe Mexican rather than Spanish or whether both are as common as each other. To me vete has the implication of displeasure, i.e “Leave!” rather than “Travel” or simply “go”. We really do need a native speaker to answer that one.

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:14, topic:2378”](Makes me think, by the way, of one of my favourite TV series, Dad’s Army. Captain Mainwaring (I’ve got some highly trained men here!) and Sergeant Wilson were my favourites. When Mainwaring made a mistake, and was corrected by Wilson, he inevitably would say : “Okay Wilson, I was only testing you.”)

So: Okay, Hardcastle, I was only testing you …[/quote]
;D
I always loved Dad’s Army too. Particularly liked Wilson’s polite public school manner in organising the troop on parade. “I say, would awfully mind falling in?” ;D


(scherpschutter) #17

It’s not just the database, both Giusti and Casadio list the film as VayaS con Dios, Gringo in their book

I think it’s simply a mistake made by an Italian.
Imperatives are tricky in those languages


(El Topo) #18

This is just an empiric suposition, Spanish it’s not Portuguese.

But Vete it’s not a so common expression I think, Vaya yes that’s more of commum use. And yes there are some regiosn of Portugal and I guess from Spain also (In the interior of both coutries) were the imperative it’s of more commom use, but with same meaning of the normal verb.
Like

Então, isso vai indo indo the imperative of the verb ir/go
In English would be something like thisSo, how are you going


(Bad Lieutenant) #19


(Stanton) #20

I too have a picture of a poster in the Kessler book with Vayas, while he writes the title with Vaya.

It seems Vayas is the correct title, even if it is wrong.