Dig Your Grave Friend … Sabata’s Coming / Abre tu fosa, amigo … llega Sábata / Sei già cadavere amigo … ti cerca Garringo! (Juan Bosch, 1971)


(scherpschutter) #1

The Lordradish created a review:

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Dig_Your_Grave_Friend%2C_Sabata_is_Coming_Review

It wasn’t taped off Swedish television, but Dutch television
The text in the last screenshot is Dutch, it says:
“Dirty murderous swine, you’ll only get rid of me if you kill me!”

A rare one, indeed, I had never heard of it
But if anyone comes up with Raf Baldassare playing Sabata, it’s worth a look, I suppose

The Italian title doesn’t mention Sabata:
Sei già cadavere, amigo … ti cerca Garringo! (You’re already a corpse, my friend … Garringo is looking for you!)
Still, according to Giusti Baldassare plays a character called Sabata
They clearly started to run out of ideas and thought making things more complicated would help …

Note: in Giusti I also read that producer Iquino co-directed the movie according to Richard Harrison
The film was apparently made over a longer period. Every now and then, when nobody was engaged elsewhere, people gathered at the Balcasar studios near Barcelona to shoot a series of scenes


The Man from Oklahoma / Oklahoma John / Il ranch degli spietati (Jaime Jesús Balcázar, Roberto Bianchi Montero, 1965)
(lordradish) #2

Ahh… Dutch tv. My lack of knowlege about non-Romantic European languages is showing. I’ll have to change it.


(scherpschutter) #3

Swedish and Dutch are good candidates, I guess, for the Bastard lookalikes thread

I was watching a DVDr of Taste for Killing the other day
All the time I was wondering whether the subs were Japanese or Corean (or Thai)


(Silvanito) #4
The text in the last screenshot is Dutch, it says: "Dirty murderous swine, you'll only get rid of me if you kill me!"

In Swedish it would be something like:

Jävla mördarsvin, bara om du dödar mig blir du av med mig! :smiley:


(scherpschutter) #5

[quote=“Lindberg, post:4, topic:1178”]In Swedish it would be something like:

Jävla mördarsvin, bara om du dödar mig blir du av med mig! :D[/quote]

mördar - moordenaar
svin - zwijn
du - jij (German : du)
dödar - doden
blir - blijf
med - met
mig - mij (If I’m not mistaken, the Dutch word is pronounced more or less like the Swedish word)

In Fries - the second language of holland, spoken in the nord - mij is even written 'mig’
I suppose Fries is even closer to swedish and other scandinavian languages than Dutch
A duo from friesland had a smash hit a few years ago, I’ll see if I can find a clip on You Tube


(scherpschutter) #6

Here it is (somebody already made a translation):


(p.pereira) #7

Watched a Spanish version of this one. The image is much better than screenshots posted in the review mentioned, therefore Miller’s mustache didn’t seems as fake as Lordradish thought. I don’t consider the movie awfully bad, but knowing “Deus no céu… Arizona na terra” I’d expect something better from Juan Bosch.


(ION BRITTON) #8

Boring run of the mill stuff. I found the more lighthearted sequences quite annoying too. Not recommended at all.


(Phil H) #9

I quite enjoyed this one. It was clearly a low budget Spanish affair but Harrison complete with bald patch, Baldassare as Sabata and Fernando Sancho as…well, Fernando Sancho made an appealing enough combination to keep me entertained.

I always find the odd mix in such films strange in a modern context. The tone of the film is clearly a predominantly light hearted buddy film. Almost Saturday morning picture stuff actually. Practically nobody gets killed until the end and the bad guy is largely inept despite his notorious reputation. But then, out of left field, a Mexican bandit says to his pal “Look, that’s Miller’s fiance. Let’s rape her!”

What the…?!?


(Stranger) #10

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:5, topic:1178”]mördar - moordenaar
svin - zwijn
du - jij (German : du)
dödar - doden
blir - blijf
med - met
mig - mij (If I’m not mistaken, the Dutch word is pronounced more or less like the Swedish word)

In Fries - the second language of holland, spoken in the nord - mij is even written 'mig’
I suppose Fries is even closer to swedish and other scandinavian languages than Dutch
A duo from friesland had a smash hit a few years ago, I’ll see if I can find a clip on You Tube[/quote]

The Frisian languages (or language though I agree with the former) is also the closest language to the English language (or languages, depending on whom you ask) being Anglo-Frisian, which is of course Ingvaeonic (the Anglo-Frisian tongues along with Low German) which though a “West Germanic” language is “North-West” really in that it has many features in common with the Scandinavian (North Germanic) tongues.

I would say Scots and Northumbrian “Inglis” is the closest in vocab and sound to the Frisian speech, especially North Frisian. Germans sometimes mistake Northern English and Lowland Scots folk for Scandinavians at times so you may be onto something in regards to Frisian being akin to Swedish, however as Dutch is West Germanic and features some Ingvaeonic features it is slightly closer to Dutch than any Scandinavian language. Going from closest to least: FRISIAN> English (Northumbrian/Scots > Standard) > Low German > Dutch > Central High German > Upper High German. I haven’t figured in the Scandinavian languages only the West Germanic languages… but they are less related to Frisian than High German but are far closer to Frisian than they are to High German.


(Bad Lieutenant) #11

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:5, topic:1178”]mördar - moordenaar
svin - zwijn
du - jij (German : du)
dödar - doden
blir - blijf
med - met
mig - mij (If I’m not mistaken, the Dutch word is pronounced more or less like the Swedish word)[/quote]
Hey, scherpschutter. Our amigo Boobers did this, you might like it:
http://www.filmboob.nl/falsefriends


(Nzoog Wahrlfhehen) #12

Miller’s moustache is not fake: actor Alejandro Ulloa (not the cinematographer) always wore it in the films he made during this period: you can see him in SARANDA looking much the same.

Iquino probably did anonymously co-direct the film. As producer, he would often turn up on set, get outraged by what he saw, shout the director away and take over the making of the film. His exact filmography is a little difficult to establish because he often signed films he hadn’t made and made films he didn’t sign. Once, in the fifties, he got bored with a film he was making, so he passed it on to his assistant director, and went on to something else.


(El Topo) #13

Looking for a Fidani to watch, and got stuck on this.

First thing I must say is that to fully appreciate the film, you need to watch the Spanish language version, with English audio the film looses more than half of its fun, mostly cause of Sancho alone, his lines in Spanish are great if you understand it of course (one of the few advantages of beeing Portuguese is that we understand a lot of languages, and try hard on the others lol), the thing is that he doesn’t talk like a Mexican bandit, but like a Iberian gipsy or “lello” as we say here, wich is a funny thing to us cause there’s a lot of jokes with that way of speaking, his lines on the scene were he’s eating the watermelon are great, so the film does lost a bit in translation if you don’t understand Spanish.
Other thing that struck me was that I already had seen it without knowing when I start watching this time around, I rented it a long time ago in the a video club (I really know how to pick them), the scene that sparked my memory was when Sabata/Baldasarre shot the fly in his bath.
So I kind of like it, if you think of it like a comedy it was fun, not too much violent, and Sancho steals the all show, Baldassare looks great as the villain (even if not a very good one), and I like Harrison in SW, way better than in his ninja flicks.
The score is great and helps the viewing, so fun, not pretentious, some very cool lines, puts it somewhere in my alternative alternative top 20.

3 Sanchos


(scherpschutter) #14

[quote=“Bad Lieutenant, post:11, topic:1178”]Hey, scherpschutter. Our amigo Boobers did this, you might like it:
http://www.filmboob.nl/falsefriends[/quote]

Hadn’t noticed this before
Yes, I do like it. Those Scandinavian languages are very close to Dutch, but there are a lot of pitfalls in the form of false friends. That’s probably also the reason why we have the feeling those languages sounds ‘funny’ (especially Swedish)


(ENNIOO) #15

Due to view this one soon.


(Handcuffs68) #16

I’ve always wanted to see this one, but now finding out it’s trash! I THINK I’LL PASS.


(Reverend Danite) #17

This was my randomly picked choice for last night after a few scoops.
I have to agree with pretty much everything his Sir Radishness has said in the review, and with Phil and E.T.‘s additions.
I watched the improved Spanish print and would have liked to have understood Fernando’s missing lines, cos he was the main reason for keeping me chuckling throughout this.
I have to disagree with his lordship tho’ about Raf’s mean and moody black-clad portrayal of the hired assassin pistolero. I thought he was brilliant - the part where he assassinates ‘our hero buddies’ with the mirror trick was hilariously done.
Now it’s well documented that I’m no fan of comedy spags, but this was no farce, and I knew what I was in for within minutes of this starting. I let myself be carried by the nonsense, expecting the obligatory barroom brawl and fisticuffs, and enjoyed what is really otherwise a poor spaghetti-by-numbers buddy movie.
If it had been anybody else than the four main leads - the permanently bare-chested R.H, wisecracking F.S, too cool for his own good R.B and the hot-headed redheaded female smooch interest, then this could have been a real turkey.

But - it sorta worked - 2 enjoyable stars.


(scherpschutter) #18

Huh … ?

“Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.” (Romans 12:19)


(JonathanCorbett) #19

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:1, topic:1178”]The Italian title doesn’t mention Sabata:
Sei già cadavere, amigo … ti cerca Garringo! (You’re already a corpse, my friend … Garringo is looking for you!)
Still, according to Giusti Baldassare plays a character called Sabata
They clearly started to run out of ideas and thought making things more complicated would help …[/quote]

There’s no Sabata in the Italian version: Sancho repeatedly calls Steve Garringo (indirectly “insulting” Steffen: «Why?» asks the character played by Harrison « 'Cause you have a Garringo face» «And what’s a Garringo face like?» «A son of a bitch face!»), while the bounty hunter played by Baldassarre is named Gregory.

The French title solves the problem including both names: Creuse ta fosse Garringo, Sabata revient! :smiley:


#20

Contrary to my expectations I enjoyed this pedestrian film, in particular its insouciance. A fine DVD version of it was recently released by the German Label With No Name (run time: 86 min 17 s [PAL]; audio tracks in German and Spanish; German subtitles for the parts omitted from the German theatrical release prints in 1972).