And the Crows Will Dig Your Grave / Los buitres cavarán tu fosa (Juan Bosch, 1971)


(CactusCharlie) #1

I have read various synopsis on this movie , all bad i’m afraid to say but as i collect SW’s and the title intrigues me , i was wondering if anyone knew where to get a copy of it.


(ENNIOO) #2

I watched this one recently and enjoyed very much.


(CactusCharlie) #3

Any chance of a copy?


(Reverend Danite) #4

Below is a copy/paste from the ‘Recommended unknown Spaghettis!’ thread whereby I also pretty much rate it as worth seeing as well. I quote myself …

If I may - could I suggest another goodie? (I dont think you have mentioned it much, and I know of no official recent release - so it should qualify?)
I watched thist last night … AND THE CROWS WILL DIG YOUR GRAVE. (Vhs copy)
It’s not as dark as some of the above but it aint played for laughs either (tied up in barbed wire and kicked - that hurts! - A highly entertaining film with plenty of switched allegiences and intrigue … and altogether a far better film than Weisser would have you believe. (imdb aint got an opinion.) Craig Hill looks Satana-smooth (grey suit witha black velvet collar) but is much more fallible. His character works well played off the double crosses of Angel Aranda’s and Fernando Sancho’s characters.
It may not be a top of the drawer western but it had plenty of story and entertainment to keep me there till the final shootout.
There’s even 2 references to crows - Fernando does an impersonation of one and Craig gets likened to one, at various points of the film - but how that relates to the title … ? Recommended.
Anybody else got any views on this one?


(ENNIOO) #5

What a great title to a film though…


(scherpschutter) #6

I haven’t seen the movie, but I guess the crows or ravens (in the Italian title the birds are called corvi, raven) are used as symbols for moral corruption, perfidy and (more general) death and destruction

They’re an ancient symbol in christian art, and as such probably as old as the religion itself and referring to the crucifiction and the crows or ravens that picked out the eyes of crucified people; the spaghetti western, being a catholic genre (much stronger concentrated on imagery than on words) has adopted this christian symbolism


(ENNIOO) #7

Very interesting.


(Reverend Danite) #8

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:6, topic:878”]I haven’t seen the movie, but I guess the crows or ravens (in the Italian title the birds are called corvi, raven) are used as symbols for moral corruption, perfidy and (more general) death and destruction

They’re an ancient symbol in christian art, and as such probably as old as the religion itself and referring to the crucifiction and the crows or ravens that picked out the eyes of crucified people; the spaghetti western, being a catholic genre (much stronger concentrated on imagery than on words) has adopted this christian symbolism[/quote]
This is my territory. I’ve had a crow sanctuary, and looked after magpies, jackdaws and crows (no ravens tho’).
The ‘crow’ is at least doubley-damned. Originally white and with a beautiful voice, Apollo cursed it for telling the truth about an infidelity. The bible also damns the ‘raven’ (an umbrella term for crows) as it was the first to be released from the ark, but quite wisely fucked off! Once bitten …
They’ve got a lot to be pissed about!


(ENNIOO) #9

A man of many skills then Reverend or a Jack of all trades ? ???.


(Søren) #10

In Norse mythology the ravens Hugin and Munin sat on the shoulders of Odin, flew out every morning and returned in the evening telling Odin news of the world of Gods and men. That is, nice birdies :slight_smile:

Probably why it was a cursed bird in Christian mythology which had to distance itself from every type ‘paganism’.


(Reverend Danite) #11

These guys - ‘wobbley gob’ and ‘rizla’ call me the master. The top one’s the ‘jack’ :wink:

[attachment older than 600 days, deleted by admin]


(ENNIOO) #12

Ah…I see Reverend :D.

Jack looks a bit of a mean dude :o.


(Reverend Danite) #13

:-\ <-- W.G. That cat of yours wouldn’t stand a chance ENNIOO! :wink: He didn’t get a bent beak for nothin’!


(scherpschutter) #14

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:6, topic:878”]I haven’t seen the movie, but I guess the crows or ravens (in the Italian title the birds are called corvi, raven) are used as symbols for moral corruption, perfidy and (more general) death and destruction

They’re an ancient symbol in christian art, and as such probably as old as the religion itself and referring to the crucifiction and the crows or ravens that picked out the eyes of crucified people; the spaghetti western, being a catholic genre (much stronger concentrated on imagery than on words) has adopted this christian symbolism[/quote]

In Rome I heard a priest say to an American lady, in a friendly way (he was an American himself):
“Never correct a priest in church!”

So i’m not going to correct the rev on his territory

I didn’t remember the story of Apollo and the (originally white) raven, but it’s clear that Greek mythology and philosophy had an influence on the New Testament, which is no wonder since the evangelists wrote in Greek. Especially pre-socratic Greek philosophers often sound (to our ears that is!) christian. There’s also a strong influence of neo-platonism and (Roman) stoïcism.

What AvatarDK said sounds logical, but I doubt if it’s true; of course christianity wanted to distance itself from every type of paganism (and everything except christianity was considered paganism for quite some time) but at the same time they adopted a considerable amount of elements from pagan doctrines: the christmas tree is a pagan symbol, in different parts of the world burning trees were used as supplications (to the Gods) to dissolve the so-called winter ‘solstice’, the immovability of the sun sunk behind the horizon. The virgin birth is a narrative element present in most oriental doctrines (but most likely derived from the Mithras Cult) and Noah’s ark is taken from ancient sumerian writings. But of course the fact that those birds were used in a more positive way in a pagan mythology, might have reinforced their bad name in christianity (as if a double curse wasn’t enough already!).


(ENNIOO) #15

Oh for sure ;)… he is best at keeping my feet warm whilst in bed :).


(Søren) #16

Of yes. Of course most of Christianity mythology is stolen, whoops, I mean borrowed from other mythologies to ease the transition where the religion was to grow roots, and also because it is easier to have a hit with previous proven hit-material. Christianity is therefore a sort of ‘best of’ of all kinds of different religions/mythologies.

Addition: I by the way haven’t watched this movie either but it certainly has one of the forces which is one of the things that has drawn me to spaghetti westerns, that is, a fantastic title which may not have much to do with the movie itself but which certainly is compelling.

That said the other ‘crow’-movie On the Third Day Arrived the Crow is so miserably bad to maybe put my expectations for this one somewhat down.


(scherpschutter) #17

[quote=“AvatarDK, post:16, topic:878”]Addition: I by the way haven’t watched this movie either but it certainly has one of the forces which is one of the things that has drawn me to spaghetti westerns, that is, a fantastic title which may not have much to do with the movie itself but which certainly is compelling.

That said the other ‘crow’-movie On the Third Day Arrived the Crow is so miserably bad to maybe put my expectations for this one somewhat down.[/quote]

Totally agree with you about those titles
Even as a young boy, with no knowledge of Italian (and little of English) I was fascinated by those titles, as well as by the posters and names of the actors and directors : Vado, l’ammazzo e torno* - what the hell could that mean ?? I didn’t know, but the translation ‘For a few bullets more’ (???) was certainly not correct ! Ammazali tutti … e torna solo !** - wonderful title, and this time the translation seemed more appropriate: Kill them all … and come back alone ! - once read, you never forget such a title … spaghetti memories …

On the third day arrived the Crow : this title is easily interpreted as inspired by all the symbolism we have been talking about the last few hours: the third day, the Crow (the baddies?), arrived (a word often used in titles: arriva … fill in your favourite character’s name).

That it’s a bad film doesn’t surprise me: it’s from '73, clearly twilight …

Notes:

  • it means : I go, I kill him, and come back (we know this film now as ‘Any gun can play’)

** I’ve seen this one in cinema, in the early 70s I suppose, later I saw it again on VHS, soon it will be released on DVD by Wild East - don’t miss it, it’s wonderful

The sumerian writings I was talking about in a privious post, are called ‘The Gilgamesj Epic’


(CactusCharlie) #18

Just received this , courtesy of Ennnio.

Great Movie , the synopsis i read were utter BS.

Thanks Mate.

:slight_smile:


(ENNIOO) #19

As I have mentioned before what a great title to a film. Nice score by Bruno Nicolai. One of the better Craig Hill westerns from the 70’s for me.


(chuck connors brother) #20

I agree, the score is incredible.