A Man Called Django / W Django! (Edoardo Mulargia, 1971)


(Sebastian) #1

Database link (click!)http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/W_Django%21

I am watching this Steffen flick right now. Why is it called “W Django”? what does W stand for?


(EL CHUNCHO) #2

I’ve read that the “W” stands for the Spanish word “Eviva”- means in German " Es lebe Django".
For instance “Viva la revol…”- Viva is the short form.
btw: Terrific website, great job- keep on going!!


(Sebastian) #3

ok thanks

a quite enjoyable revenge western by the way.


(EL CHUNCHO) #4

Yes, pretty enjoyable but badly cut and unkind presentation by Starmedia- I hate such labels like
Best Ent., MedienvertriebsGes., Starmedia!!


(Sebastian) #5

oh yeah. they suck.

who else saw the film? i think Steffen did a good job. but the film didn’t look that “western” to me. especially steffen’s clothes!


(Wolf) #6

I also saw the movie and in my opinion it’s enjoyable. But I’ve heard, that Mulargia copied from other movies.


(Bluntwolf) #7

W Django (Ein Fressen für Django) is one of Mulgarias better westerns !!!
No masterpiece but certainly solid average stuff !!!


(Kolpitz) #8

Does anyone on here know much about the Full Screen All Region DVD that was released in the US? Sources claim that it was imported by Koch and the DVD itself says it was released by Dagored Films. I took a trip over to A Fistful of DVDs and they have the Dagored release as being in a cropped 1.70:1 non-anamorphic widescreen (as opposed to full screen, although it’s pretty close). It also lists the disc as being cut by over ten minutes. I was wondering if this was the same as the “US” disc. Websites list the US disc as being 90 minutes but I can’t find a running time on the packaging and I don’t want to open it until I’m sure it’s not cut. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #9

I got myself a dagored one and like their “Milano Rovente” the print aint that hot.

I don’t know if it’s cut or not but it’s the only one with English subs.

The Dagored one was pulled from the shelves (Shit print but has English subtitles) because they didn’t have the rights to the film apparently (this is what i’ve been told, so it’s not gospel)
It is also slightly letterboxed at about 1.78:1

Then it had a better official release in Italy with a nice letterbox print but Italian only.No subs.Nothing.

That remind’s me, i still ain’t got round to watching the whole film yet!!!


(Sundance) #10

Kolpitz, is your disc this one
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BFJM0S/sr=8-1/qid=1155192571/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-2701669-1317600?ie=UTF8 ?

That should be the disc I have (I bought it from xploitedcinema), and which has screenshots and info at Fistful of DVDs. Truly awful looking DVD and yes it is cut at several places… and unless the PAL disc from Italy happens to run at film speed instead of PAL speed, then the Dagored disc is atleast around 10minutes shorter (it could be more, but I have a feeling the Dagored disc actually runs in PAL speed even though its an NTSC disc).

So if you have a Dagored disc, I would say its the same as I doubt (and haven’t heard that) they would have released two versions of it.

The Koch you mention is apparently some Canadian company and not the one from Germany (Koch Media).


(Cian) #11

New World Entertainment are soon releasing an uncut version, widescreen german and english audio.


(Silvanito) #12

Would be great if you posted this, and if there’s more news you’re aware of, in the “DVD news topic”.


(Cian) #13

If I knew how to ! I’m barely know how to switch on my PC. I’m one of those Luddites who still plays vinyl and hasn’t gone metric yet!


(Silvanito) #14

Haha, oldschool :slight_smile:

But don’t worry the topic is in the DVD board not the wiki, check it out and just do a normal post!


(Kolpitz) #15

[quote=“Sundance, post:10, topic:162”]Kolpitz, is your disc this one
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BFJM0S/sr=8-1/qid=1155192571/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-2701669-1317600?ie=UTF8 ?[/quote]

That’s the one. Damn. I hate cut spags. Oh well. I guess I’ll give it a spin anyway, seeing as my All Region player is broken and I can’t afford another one at the time.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #16

i hope this release is a nice version because the Italian dagored dvd i have isn’t a very nice print.


(Stanton) #17

A boring, below average film


(Sebastian) #18

btw that german remastered disc is out, i added the information to the article page of this film


(scherpschutter) #19

Watched this one yesterday, in poor fullscreen video quality, with unreadable subtitles (probably Hebrew)

First things first: the title should be read as VIVA DJANGO
W is short for ViVa, not Eviva like somebody had heard. Viva is the Italian imperative of the verb 'vivere = to live’
The opposite is M (in reality two times a V upside down), meaning: AbAsso = down with
In Italy you may read, on walls, railway arches etc. things like:
W Inter, M Milan, meaning: Long live Inter, down with Milan

I’d advice Sebastian & Co to list the movie under W
People who don’t speak Italian are likely to look for it overthere

The movie: average stuff. Like more SWs of the early seventies (Arizona Colt returns is a good example) the film is a combination of silly humour and pretty violent action. The action isn’t bad, provided that it’s not meant to be funny. In that case it’s awful, and often like this: Django uses dynamite, we hear a blast and see people jumping through windows, screaming oooh and aaah.

The story: most critics say it’s a (sort of) remake of Death rides a Horse. Indeed: sort of. Mulargia uses some plot elements of Petroni’s movie, and adds one twist near the end. Actually, the last twenty minutes of the movie are quite good. But not only Death rides a Horse is plundered : Django uses a lot of dynamite, like Johnny Oro, and has a musical box, that reminds us of Colonel Mortimer’s watch. In other words: you’ve seen it all before, but not necessarily in the same order

Steffen sleepwalks through the movie, but the supporting actors are quite good. Stelio Candeli, as the main villain, and Glauco Onorato, as the man who puts Django on the trail of the murderers of his wife, are both excellent.
By the way: some have doubted that the woman killed in the first minutes, was Django’s wife. Frayling even says it’s unclear why Django seeks revenge (as if the opening scene didn’t belong to the movie!). But in this version it is mentioned at least twice that the woman was indeed Django’s wife. I’ve never seen the original Italian version, but Giusti confirms that the woman is called Django’s wife in the final scenes.

Watch it for those final twenty minutes or the excellent soundtrack by Piero Umiliani


(ENNIOO) #20

I have an Italian friend who said this re the title, but I was having none of it at the time!..I will let him know I stand corrected.