10,000 Dollars for a Massacre / 10.000 dollari per un massacro (Romolo Guerrieri, 1967)


(Silver) #41

LOL! Thanks ;D


(Silver) #42

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y268/Hellbender/SW/PDVD_046.jpg

:wink:


(Chris_Casey) #43

This film is in my Top 20 Favorite Spaghetti Westerns!
I think Romolo Guerrieri (who is Enzo Castellari’s uncle, by the way!) is a very underrated director. He also made another personal favorite of mine, JOHNNY YUMA, which—like $10, 000 BLOOD MONEY–also has a brilliant score by Nora Orlandi.

I think I will go and watch this one again, right now!


(seanmallory) #44

I wanna see this, but in my country it is impossible. Very few SW dvds… And not even found a download. :frowning:
Is there sy from Austria who knows where to get it? Perhaps in Eisenstadt or in the worst case, in Wien? I live in the border, so I can travel to Austria easy…
Or at least a link for download…


(seanmallory) #45

Well, I promised to write a story about the duel of the brothers, and I started to translate it. My private teacher corrects it ;D because I make some mistakes with grammar.

Should I make a thread here for it and write it there in pieces or should I upload it somewhere? Can sy say me an uploading side where I can upload longer texts and it’s free and easy?


(scherpschutter) #46

Even in the italian version, Garko is called Django, so not only the Germans make loose sequels. As such, it’s one of the more interesting ones. With its homosexual overtones, christian symbolism and exuberant use of mascara, it’s also one of the weirdest.

The opening scene is wonderful. We watch Garko, waking up at the seashore, talking to a man lying beside him. When he ironically remarks that the man doesn’t care much for the sea, only for the sky, we realize that he must be dead and that Garko, Django that is, has become a bounty killer. This tongue-in-cheek scene, both grim and funny, sets the tone for an excellent first hour. Django is asked to kill an escaped prisoner (Claudio Camaso) for money but refuses because he wants to have more money, the $ 10.000 from the title.
Director Guerrieri keeps up the pace by switching between Garko and Camasio’s violent murder spree, but in the last half hour, when Garko joins Camasio’s gang, the film looses focus a little. Garko’s wife is killed when Camasio assaults the stagecoach she is travelling with, so once again Django becomes an avenger. The killing, and Garko’s grief, is echoed later when Garko kills Camasio’s father (Sancho in a nice cameo) and Camasio throws away his guns in abhorrence. The events and twists are well contrived, but seem a little forced nonetheless. Moreover, I didn’t find the protracted finale, set during a sandstorm, very convincing. I just don’t like these finales in which the protagonists are stalking each other for some time. But others have written more positively about the film’s conclusion, so it’s obviously a matter of taste.

All in all it’s a very enjoyable SW.
Planned to watch PER 100.000 DOLLARI T’AMMAZZO one of these nights.

Note: Most of you will have the Koch Media Box. I found it a bit expensive so I ordered two Spanish DVDs from SUEVIA FILMS. This one is called COMO LOBOS SEDIENTOS (Like thirsty Wolves) and has only Italian and Spanish audio (they’re loud and clear) and poor image quality;it’s not anamorphic and the average bitrate is a mere 3,1 Mb/s (!) causing a lot of troubles during the darker scenes. So, I would say: stick to you Koch DVDs.
The PER 100.000 DOLLARI DVD is much better (already checked that).


(scherpschutter) #47

The opening scene of this movie is pure magic. We see Garko, waking up at the seashore, talking to the man lying beside him. Then the camera pans little to the right and Garko ironically remarks that the man doesn’t care much for the sea, only for heaven. We realize that Garko is a bounty hunter and that the man beside him was all but sleeping. This tongue-in-cheeck scene, both grim and funny, sets the tone for one of the best unofficial Django sequels. With its homosexual overtones, outrageous Christian symbomism and exuberant use of mascara it’s also one of the weirdest.

Camasio takes revenge on the rich man whose evidence sent him to jail, by killing all his men and kidnapping his daughter. Garko is asked to chase the villain and bring the poor girl home, but he doesn’t like to work for a rich landowner and asks a price the man is unlikely to pay - the $ 10.000 from the title - for the anticipated massacre. When he is nearly killed he is nursed back to health by the local bar owner Nusciak, a proverbial tart with a heart, and falls in love with her. She asks him to give up his dangerous life, but instead he joines forces with Camasio in order to make as much money as possible (while keeping his hands clean). But being Django, he will be forced to act as an avenger once again, when Camasio assaults the stagecoach Nusciak is travelling with …

By elaborating Garko’s relationship with Nusciak, director Guerrrieri tries to add a psychological dimension to the Django character. His tragic love affair is mirrored by the relationship between Camasio and the girl he has kidnapped and subsequently deflowered. In a clear reference to popular (and unofficial) catholic mythology, she represents the virgin who becomes a harlot and eventually the most devoted follower of her master, who will mourn over his death. It’s a motto more often used in popular Italian art but apparently the Vatican wasn’t pleased with it, nor with some other religious symbolism used in the movie. At one point Garko falls from his horse and ends up on the ground, lying on his back, his arm spread wide. For people who are familiar with the baroque imagery of the catholic faith - and those who live within the Vatican usually are - this is a near sacrilegeous reference to Caravaggio’s famous painting of St. Paulus, falling from his horse on the way to Damascus. To add insult to injury, the scene results in a sort of wrestling contest between Garko and Camasio that is so clearly homosexually orientated that one must be blind to miss the point.

10.000 dollari per un massacro is an interesting, but also rather confusing spaghetti western. Some scenes are quite sentimental, others have a more comical, or even parodic edge. Django has a Mexican side-kick (called Fidelio, no less) and a horse that is as obedient as a dog. Moreover, with his silk shawl and heavy mascara I couldn’t help thinking of Peter Wyngarde as Jason King, a hero from the time when shawls, cravats and moustaches were thought of as ultra-cool. Today such elements, as well as the magnificent opening scene (considered by some as a homage to a similar scene in Bergman’s Seventh Seal) and the conclusion, a cleverly staged shoot out set in a ghost town, give the film a near surrealist look.

The film is beautifully shot and Nora Orlandi’s score is excellent, even though some experts might quibble that in some parts it’s very close to Morricone’s score for For a few dollars more. Both Garko and Camasio show a tendency to over-play their parts, but I had the idea they were asked to do so. Overall the interplay between the two men works well. Still Fernando Sancho easily steals the film as Camasio’s father.

I watched the Spanish Suevia disc, called Como lobos sedientos (Like thirsty wolves). It’s a very mediocre DVD. The film is part of the Koch Media Django box. Stick to that box. Stick to Koch !


(Silvanito) #48


(Bluntwolf) #49

One of my favourite SWs ! I like almost everything about it: The cast (Garko&Camaso are a blast), the music, the atmosphere … !!!

Also one of the first few SWs I’ve watched.


(Chris_Casey) #50

In my humble opinion, $10,000 BLOOD MONEY is simply one of the best Spaghetti Westerns ever made. I can safely say that it is in my Top 20 with ease…and it generally floats among my Top 10.

I am also of the opinion that Romolo Guerrieri is a vastly underrated director. I happen to think his JOHNNY YUMA (also featuring a brilliant score by Nora Orlandi) is another excellent Italian Western–and it too ranks among my Top 10-20.

By the way, scherpschutter—what experts have claimed that Orlandi’s score is similar to Morricone’s score for FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE?
I would really like to know who they were—because there is absolutely nothing similar (melodically, or in terms of orchestration or chord structure) between the two scores.
These so-called experts should return to their music theory classes! :slight_smile:
I don’t consider myself an expert, by any means, but I am a musician and I honestly do not see any connection between these two scores (other than the fact that they come from Italian Western films!).

At any rate, nice review, amigo!
I may not agree wholeheartedly with all you have said about the film; but, you stated your opinion quite well, I think.
I just happen to like the film even more than you do! :slight_smile:

All the best, to you!


(Bluntwolf) #51

[quote=“Chris_Casey, post:11, topic:568”]At any rate, nice review, amigo!
I may not agree wholeheartedly with all you have said about the film; but, you stated your opinion quite well, I think.
I just happen to like the film even more than you do! :)[/quote]

I’m of the same opinion for this movie is one of my favorite SWs !!! Garko and Camaso are great in this one and the score is one of the finest pieces IMO, atmosphere is also a blast !!!


(Reverend Danite) #52

Shit! - I forgot!! This is a spaghetti-western site.

I’ll never forget that moment when our main fellah finds his girl (the fabulous Loredana Nusciak) dead.
Those dead eyes!! I nearly shed a tear as well. :’(
Great film.


(scherpschutter) #53

[quote=“Chris_Casey, post:11, topic:568”]By the way, scherpschutter—what experts have claimed that Orlandi’s score is similar to Morricone’s score for FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE?
I would really like to know who they were—because there is absolutely nothing similar (melodically, or in terms of orchestration or chord structure) between the two scores.
These so-called experts should return to their music theory classes! :slight_smile:
I don’t consider myself an expert, by any means, but I am a musician and I honestly do not see any connection between these two scores (other than the fact that they come from Italian Western films!).[/quote]

I read this on an Italian site; some people thought some themes were close to the theme called (I think) ‘Goodbye Colonel’ from For a few Dollars More

I had that idea too, but then again, I’m not an expert either
Let’s see what others think of it (Ennioo is our specialist); if they agree with you, I’ll remove the remark

Nice to see you again here, Chris


(Reverend Danite) #54

Yeah - any spaghetti-surf music to be had yet?
(Of course, the link is that this film starts with the waves crashing)…
Welcome back Chris.


(Romaine Fielding) #55

I agree. Both Johnny Yuma and this film are in my top 20 favs.


(Chris_Casey) #56

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:14, topic:568”]I read this on an Italian site; some people thought some themes were close to the theme called (I think) ‘Goodbye Colonel’ from For a few Dollars More

I had that idea too, but then again, I’m not an expert either
Let’s see what others think of it (Ennioo is our specialist); if they agree with you, I’ll remove the remark

Nice to see you again here, Chris[/quote]

Thanks for the kind words, scherpschutter. It is good to be back!

There is no need for you to remove your remarks regarding the supposed similarities between some of the themes in Orlandi’s $10,000 BLOOD MONEY score and “Addio Colonel” from FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE.
If someone hears a closeness…then they hear a closeness. No big deal, really.

I just listened to the soundtrack for $10,000 BLOOD MONEY thanks to the CD that comes in the Koch Media box set. Now, I am listening to “Addio Colonel” by Morricone. The only similarities I notice is that most of the themes for Orlandi’s score are in the key of D minor…and that is also the case for most of the themes in Morricone’s score.
I take back one thing I said above, too…I said that the orchestrations are not similar; but, listening to this track I find that they are. The strings are arranged in the same way…but, the melody line is entirely different.

At any rate, it isn’t important, in the end.
And I don’t see any need for you to adjust your remarks, or change your opinion, amigo.

Take care!

By the way, if anyone cares to…they can listen to some of the demo recordings I have done for the supposedly upcoming Western film, HIRED GUNS, here:

It isn’t surf-rock spaghetti, Rev. Danite—but, it might be close. :slight_smile:


(Romaine Fielding) #57

Nice review Scherpschutter.
I have to go back and watch this all the way through again soon.
I’ve watched the begining of this film many times but seen it all the way through only twice I think.
And in my memory large swatches are lost.
I DO find the mascara a little unsettling…


(Paco Roman) #58

An excellent SW! It includes everything (or most) what I expect from a SW. The Koch Media DVD is also very good. :slight_smile:


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #59

I liked this movie and I thought the only weakness was that the last 20 minutes or so dragged on a bit. Like Scherp said, the movie seems to lose focus towards the end. I also didn’t like the mascara. It looked stupid. Still a classic though. And I thought it was a little bit better than Vengeance is mine.


(Tigrero) #60

I thoroughly enjoyed this film. I thought the later part of the film was great. Django was totally playing with Camasio’s head.
As someone else said it is all a matter of taste.