Zapata Westerns


(alk0) #1

I like zapata westerns and thought it would be a good idea to list all of zapata SWs and Eurowesterns. Maybe it can be a nice reference guide. So, i would be grateful if you could help me list all the SWs and Eurowesterns set durning the Mexican Revolution.
These are the ones i know about, please post some more below and i will add them to this list:

SWs:
Bad Man’s River (1971, Director: Eugenio Martin)
El Bandido Malpelo (1971, Director: Giuseppe Maria Scotese)
Blood Church (1985, Director: Tom Vacca)
Che c’entriamo noi con la rivoluzione (1973, Director: Sergio Corbucci)
Un esercito di cinque uomini (1969, Directors: Italo Zingarelli & Dario Argento)
Giù la testa (1971, Director: Sergio Leone)
Le Goût de la violence (1961, Director: Robert Hossein )
Un Hombre Y Un Colt (1967, Director: Tulio Demicheli)
Io sono il capataz (1951, Director: Giorgio Simonelli)
Killer Kid (1967, Director: Leopoldo Savona)
Il Mercenario (1968, Director: Sergio Corbucci)
Monta in sella, figlio di…! (1972, Director: Tonino Ricci)
Pancho Villa (1972, Director: Eugenio Martin)
Partirono preti, tornarono… curati (1973, Director: Stelvio Massi)
Quien Sabe (1967, Director: Damiano Damiani)
Quintana (1969, Director: Vincenzo Musolino)
Tepepa (1968, Director: Giulio Petroni)
Un Treno per Durango (1967, Director: Mario Caiano)
Tutti per uno… botte per tutti (1973, Director: Bruno Corbucci)
Uomo avvisato mezzo ammazzato… Parola di Spirito Santo (1971, Director: Giuliano Carnimeo)
Vamos a matar, compañeros (1970, Director: Sergio Corbucci)
Viva La Muerte… Tua! (1971, Director: Duccio Tessari)
Viva Maria (1965, Director: Louis Malle)

Eurowesterns:
100 Rifles (1969, Director:Tom Gries)
Adventurous Youth (1928, Edward Godal)
Cannon for Cordoba (1969, Director:Paul Wendkos)
Guns of the Revolution (1971, Director:Arthur Lubin)
Krasnye kolokola, film pervyy - Meksika v ogne (1982, Director: Sergei Bondarchuk)
Los siete de Pancho Villa (1967, Director:José María Elorrieta)
Mexikanische Revolution (1968, Director:Jürgen Goslar)
A Town Called Hell (1971, Director: Robert Parrish)
Trini (1976, Director: Walter Beck)
Villa Rides (1968, Director:Buzz Kulik)
Zapata (1971, Director: Melih Gülgen)


(alk0) #2

Come on, nobody wants to help me accomplish this noble task? I thought it’s a pretty good idea to compile something like that. :frowning:


(Stanton) #3

100 Rifles and Villa Rides are USA only westerns.

Guns of t. M. 7 is not by Kennedy. All Mag. 7 films are US westerns imo. But Kennedy’s Return o. t. 7 is a spanish co-production.

Both Hallelujah films
Adios Sabata
Run Man Run
Killer Kid
Los amigos


(Stanton) #4

Have a look at this:

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/forum/index.php/topic,567.0.html


(alk0) #5

[quote=“stanton, post:3, topic:1004”]100 Rifles and Villa Rides are USA only westerns.

Guns of t. M. 7 is not by Kennedy. All Mag. 7 films are US westerns imo. But Kennedy’s Return o. t. 7 is a spanish co-production.

Both Hallelujah films
Adios Sabata
Run Man Run[/quote]
I included 100 riles and villa rides because they’re on the database, as well as guns for mag 7.
Adios Sabata is set durining the French intervention in Mexico [1861-67] not Mexican Revoltution [1910-17]. Not sure wether Hallelujah films aren’t as well. Run, man, run is not Zapata as well - it has got 2 French guys who stayed in Mexico after the intervention and they aren’t that old, so i say it’s set in 1870s.


(Stanton) #6

Yes, the Halleluja films have the austrian soldiers.

Guns… , 100 R. , Villa R. , then they, he he, shouldn’t be in the database.


(alk0) #7

[quote=“stanton, post:6, topic:1004”]Yes, the Halleluja films have the austrian soldiers.

Guns… , 100 R. , Villa R. , then they, he he, shouldn’t be in the database.[/quote]
Are "Guns…’ at least set in the right period?


(Stanton) #8

Hembus’ book says it’s set around 1900. Emiliano Zapata appears as a child who gets adopted.

But the structure of the film is probably “borrowed” by the SWs.


(Phil H) #9

[quote=“stanton, post:3, topic:1004”]100 Rifles and Villa Rides are USA only westerns.

Guns of t. M. 7 is not by Kennedy. All Mag. 7 films are US westerns imo. But Kennedy’s Return o. t. 7 is a spanish co-production.

Both Hallelujah films
Adios Sabata
Run Man Run
Killer Kid
Los amigos[/quote]

Not sure about the others but I don’t think Run Man Run can be included either. I know the opening scenes show signs that are anti Diaz but he was in power in Mexico most of the time from the 1870s until the revolutionary period. There was always unrest during this time and anti government groups but the revolution as we know it was strictly a 20th century affair. I don’t think RMR or The Big Gundown is set in the 20th century.


(alk0) #10

If you’re speaking of movie stariing Anthony Quinn & Franco Nero it was set in Texas in 1840s as fa as i know.

Exactly!


(Stanton) #11

Well, the structure of Los amigos is similar, but you’re right it was Texas. My memory …


(Chris_Casey) #12

This always starts a “debate” (nicest word I could think of! ha ha!), but I consider ANY Western movie that had financing to some degree from either Italian or Spanish companies as a EuroWestern. Whether the structure of the film is “Spaghetti” in nature, or not.
That is why I consider 100 RIFLES, MAN CALLED SLEDGE, CANON FOR CORDOBA, and others to be Spaghetti Westerns. And that is why they are in the database.

Anyway, I think you pretty much have the titles well covered above.
But, you might want to add CANON FOR CORDOBA and WHAT AM I DOING IN THE REVOLUTION?.
I have never seen, believe it or not, A TRAIN FOR DURANGO with Steffen and Damon, isn’t it a 20th century Mexican Revolution film?

And by the way, as far as the Mexican people are concerned…the French Intervention, as you call it, and the Zapata era Revolution are both “Mexican Revolutions”. They refer to them as either the Revolution of Juarez (against the French) or the Revolution of Zapata (or more commonly the Revolution of Villa). They (the Mexican people) really, really take offense when anyone (especially Europeans) call the Revolution of Juarez the French Intervention–because they feel that is a slam on them as a nation and as a people. They feel the phrase implies that the Mexican people were so backward and idiotic that the Europeans had to “intervene” in order to “save them”. I am not joking in the slightest, the topic of either Revolution can still raise prideful tempers among the Mexican people, even to this day!

Of course, being as most of you guys are in Europe and will rarely–if ever–come into contact with any Mexicans it is more than safe for you to use the phrase “French Intervention” for the Juarez Revolution. But, for me…living as I do only 20 minutes or so from the Mexican border…I have to be careful what I say or I might end up in a physical altercation!
:slight_smile:

Oh, and PS==GUNS OF THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, was directed by Paul Wendkos, had some major Spanish financing in back of it, and was lensed in Spain. Hence, I would say it is an European Western.
But, that could just be my opinion… :wink:


(alk0) #13

Thanks, i’ve added Cannon for Cordoba and Train for Durango to the list [What am i doing… was already there]. And thatnks for the info on Mexican views on both of revolutions, who knows maybe you saved me from some physical harm if i ever go to Mexico :wink:
Anyway, do you know anything about the ones i’m not sure about?


(Chris_Casey) #14

Oops!
Yes…I meant to comment about BLOOD CHURCH and UN HOMBRE Y UN COLT.

I have never seen BLOOD CHURCH but it is set during the Revolution of Villa/Zapata. It is, I am told, a musical Western. One description of it said it was like the “ranchera” movies of Luis Aguilar (who was the Mexican equivalent of the American singing cowboys like Gene Autry or Roy Rogers!). That description was more than enough to keep me from watching it! :smiley:

UN HOMBRE Y UN COLT is just a Western, in my opinion. It has been awhile since I have seen it (we are talking about the Robert Hundar film, right?); but, I don’t recall any real Revolution elements coming to play in the plot. I have the Spanish DVD for this, so I may watch it again, soon, and let you know. But, as it stands right now…I don’t think it belongs on the list.

Ciao!

PS= I don’t know that I would keep DUELLO NEL TEXAS on your list, amigo. If you are going strictly for Zapata era Revolution films it probably needs to go. It takes place in the 1870’s (the Juarez era)…and the Revolution doesn’t really have much of an effect on the plot, either (other than giving an explanation as to why Richard Harrison isn’t at home in the first portion of the film).
Just my two cents!


(Stanton) #15

Robert Hosseins excellent The Taste of Violence is also set in a revolution, not in a specific one, but it’s interesting to compare it with the Zapata westerns.

Same goes for O Cangaceiro (except for the excellent part).


(alk0) #16

Can you tell me how can i get this one?


(Stanton) #17

I have a copy from a german TV showing from the late 80s.

Seldom, and german audio only.


(alk0) #18

[quote=“stanton, post:17, topic:1004”]I have a copy from a german TV showing from the late 80s.

Seldom, and german audio only.[/quote]
That’s a pity. Mein Deutsch ist sehr schlecht :frowning:


(Stanton) #19

Grammatically perfect.


(alk0) #20

I only know simple stuff like this in German.