Train for Durango [Koch Media]

Well… this one just looks downright unprofessional. When you look at the design of the other ones in the new series, even if you don’t like them that much, they still look ten times better than this one. And the colour…

Why can’t they just use posters for their covers?

Custom cover job for me when I get this one.

Hrm. Amazon.de lists this movie now this way:

Seems like the back of the package…
???

it has listed this movie that way since almost 2 years ago when it was first announced/rumored. I tried to tell them there’s a new cover, they didn’t accept the change

Because in Germany old-style-poster-covers (especially for SWs) are typical for budget-titles. So if you make a poster-cover the great German retailers (Media Markt, Saturn, Karstadt-Quelle…) don’t take the DVDs for this price. They are not interested in the restoration of the movies, not interested in the interviews, booklet-texts etc. they only say: “Good grief, another old Spaghetti western…”

Thanks for the info. Didn’t know that

there was a change in cover art. i updated it in the SWDB.

out now (tomorrow). happy pre-ordering (our amazon links? thanks)

my review is up (german only so far). absolute must buy

I just got around to watching this. Fortunately they have english subs for the extras as well as the movie unlike other Koch releases.

I’m not really into Zapatas and I thought this one was average, although the acting was great from the 3 leads.

I was however, disappointed with the Mark Damon interview. The man is positively a jackass. I took many of his outrageous claims with a grain of salt. He seems to give himself too much credit for everything. From other interviews I’ve seen I’m aware that Italians have a penchant for “talking big”, but Damon beats all of them.

Among his finest:

  1. Turning down Fistful of dollars and recommending “his good friend” Clint Eastwood for the part. Didn’t Richard Harrison say the same thing?

  2. Co-wrote Django with Sergio Corbucci.

  3. The script for Django was originally written with him in mind. Actually, Ruggero Deodato said in another interview for Blue Underground that Damon had “too many teeth” to play an anti hero.

  4. Personally trained Anthony Steffen for two weeks on how to be comedic, going so far as to say that he was “proud” of Steffen when he managed to pull it off. My guess is that Steffen was way too conceited to let anyone “teach” him how to act, and it was just Damon’s way of giving himself credit for Steffen’s surprisingly outstanding performance. If anything, it was Salerno that probably contributed more to Steffen’s performance than Damon, as hinted by Mario Caiano in his interview.

  5. Franco Nero was “just a boy who was discovered at a gas station who had never acted before and needed to be taught how to act” who was hired to play Django because Mark Damon had other commitments. Actually Nero already had 8 acting credits to his name and trained at Piccolo Teatro di Milano.

  6. Was originally a director not an actor. A quick look at imdb confirms that he never directed shit.

  7. Took it upon himself to distribute foreign films to American audiences. Other from Das Boot, I don’t think he really did that.

  8. Was afraid of getting bitch slapped by ex girlfriend Dominique Boschero. LOL

Yep, sounds like a complete celebrity. :smiley:

[quote=“Col. Douglas Mortimer, post:30, topic:990”]I just got around to watching this. Fortunately they have english subs for the extras as well as the movie unlike other Koch releases.

I’m not really into Zapatas and I thought this one was average, although the acting was great from the 3 leads.

I was however, disappointed with the Mark Damon interview. The man is positively a jackass. I took many of his outrageous claims with a grain of salt. He seems to give himself too much credit for everything. From other interviews I’ve seen I’m aware that Italians have a penchant for “talking big”, but Damon beats all of them.

Among his finest:

  1. Turning down Fistful of dollars and recommending “his good friend” Clint Eastwood for the part. Didn’t Richard Harrison say the same thing?

  2. Co-wrote Django with Sergio Corbucci.

  3. The script for Django was originally written with him in mind. Actually, Ruggero Deodato said in another interview for Blue Underground that Damon had “too many teeth” to play an anti hero.[/quote]

  4. Harrison did say the same. So far, I’ve never heard of Damon being considered for the part. As far as I know, Leone first askerd Rory Calhoun, but he didn’t feel for the part. Leone also thought of James Coburn, Charles Bronson and Henry Fonda, although he probably knew he couldn’t afford them. Sometimes Steve McQueen is mentioned too.

  5. Don’t think so. I tried to reconstruct the writing history for Django for my review of the film. It’s a complicated story, and many people claim an active part in the process, but Damon wasn’t involved. (http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Django_Review_(Scherpschutter) - the Damon part is in the 5th paragraph)

  6. Apparently Corbucci promised him the part. Corbucci liked him, and wasn’t very fond of Nero initially, but producer Bolognini wanted Nero or Fabio Testi and Mrs. Corbucci talked him over to accept Nero. Nero and he soon became a working couple.

Where exactely do you find all your info, Scherp? Your reviews are chalked full of this fascinating info yet I have trouble finding anything spaghetti realted on the interent.

I probably speak/read a few more languages than you, korano
Italian, French, German and Spanish are useful languages for someone interested in SWs … so if you think about studying a new language …

You do indeed speak more than me. I know only Englsh with a few Spanish words, one or two Arabic words, and obviously some Italian. ;D

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:32, topic:990”]1. Harrison did say the same. So far, I’ve never heard of Damon being considered for the part. As far as I know, Leone first askerd Rory Calhoun, but he didn’t feel for the part. Leone also thought of James Coburn, Charles Bronson and Henry Fonda, although he probably knew he couldn’t afford them. Sometimes Steve McQueen is mentioned too.

  1. Don’t think so. I tried to reconstruct the writing history for Django for my review of the film. It’s a complicated story, and many people claim an active part in the process, but Damon wasn’t involved. (http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Django_Review_(Scherpschutter) - the Damon part is in the 5th paragraph)

  2. Apparently Corbucci promised him the part. Corbucci liked him, and wasn’t very fond of Nero initially, but producer Bolognini wanted Nero or Fabio Testi and Mrs. Corbucci talked him over to accept Nero. Nero and he soon became a working couple.[/quote]

WOW I just saw the Mark Damon interview for the anchor bay DVD of Bava’s Black Sabbath. Just when I thought there couldn’t possibly be any more bullshit coming out of Damon’s mouth he manages to come up with some more turds:

  1. It was HE who came up with the idea to make Edgar Allan Poe adaptations which he presented to Roger Corman and made a deal that he would star in the first and direct the second.

  2. He was the uncredited director of Pit and the Pendulum, not Corman. This claim has since been denied by numerous people who worked on the movie.

  3. He starred in 30 SW’s and italian action films. The number is closer to 15.

  4. He produced 70 films. The number is closer to 40.

  5. Whenever he sees Clint Eastwood, Clint apparently says to him: “Its all your fault!” since Damon is one of the 200 other people who apparently recommened Clint for FFD.

The man is a fucking liar and a damn fool. I have lost all respect for him.