The Wild Bunch (Sam Peckinpah, 1969)


(Stanton) #121

Likable. He should cut his beard though …


(Mickey13) #122

[quote=“chameleon, post:119, topic:358”]^@2.A person opposed to increased industrialization or new technology.
[/quote]
BUAHAHA ;D


(ENNIOO) #123

Yes, will trim the beard tonight :smiley: .


(The Man With a Name) #124

Any fan projects with a stereo or mono option?


(david collins) #125

The end of the Wild Bunch is breathtaking


(Stanton) #126

I don’t remember anyone complaining about the 5:1 sound. It is of course not an original sound, but it seems not to be a total fake 5.1. sound, as for so many other films.
Maybe because a true stereo sound was then produced for some 70 mm copies, and they could do something good with the stereo elements.


#127

Possibly the best movie about failure ever made.


(Martin) #128

Might be interesting: new, reasonably priced book on The Wild Bunch, just in time for the film’s fiftieth anniversary on June 18, 2019. Written by W. K. Stratton, published by Bloomsbury.


(Martin) #129

I got Stratton’s The Wild Bunch three days ago and started reading it yesterday. It’s not an academic book (no trace of pseudo-poststructuralist gibberish terminology, no trace of page references for the sources cited either) but rather conceived in the style and manner of Glenn Frankel’s book on The Searchers. Smooth reading so far – and great new words/phrases for me, e.g. “to pony up” and “idiot-box pabulum.” :slightly_smiling_face:


(scherpschutter) #130

Well well, no post-structural gibberish, but idiot-box pabulum. I guess Mr. Derrida would’ve been over the moon with such a term


(Martin) #131

Pseudo-poststructuralist!

I had to look up “pabulum” in my dictionary. And then I had to smile.


(scherpschutter) #132

I didn’t know that one either

Pseudo-poststructuralist … I wonder what the difference with genuine post-structuralism is :wink:


(Novecento) #133

If it’s anything like Glenn Frankel’s book then I’m going to love it. By the way, I liked Frankel’s book on “High Noon” even more - quite simply a brilliant read (and Frankel does thankfully include page numbers in his references).