The wide angle lense & the spaghetti western


(natos99) #1

Just wondering what the 1st film was to start using it with westerns & if they use the wide angle lense for the whole film or just certain shots…

(for all the film buffs)


(korano) #2

I have no idea. But I’ve heard that Clint the Stranger was shot in Technirama, a subsidiary of Cinerama.


(Stanton) #3

Korano you got this wrong.

Natos talks about the wide angle objective not about wide screen formats.


(korano) #4

Like I said, I have no idea.


(natos99) #5

I heard for A fistful of dollars they cut the frames in half to make it look wide screen & thats why its so grainy…

but yes Im refering the “lense”


(Stanton) #6

Ha ha, no. That’s the Techniscope format, which was a non-anamorhic widescreen format which had instead of one 1,37:1 frame two small 2,35:1 frames at the height of one perforation of the negative.

But as there were no projectors in the cinemas for these format the copies made for the cinemas were done again using usual anamorphic 35 mm film.


(Stanton) #7

Which SWs use wide angle lenses?

Normally many of them were working instead with the tele-objective, but seldom for a complete film. Boot Hill seems to be shot nearly completely by using tele lenses, which gives the film its unique visual quality. Corbucci has created in some scenes beutiful tele images. Look at the incredibly beautiful shot when in Django Major Jackson and his men accompanied by hammering music arrive in the muddy town where Nero hides behind his coffin, shortly before he opens it for the first time.


(natos99) #8

Cool thanks for that

Unfortunately I can only seem to find a wide angle lense for my camera on Ebay…

I own a sony Z1p
(not ideal shooting westerns in digital but with a few effects might make it look abit more interesting)


(goodmarksmen) #9

What an interesting question. I’m going to have fun learning more about this. :slight_smile:


(Stanton) #10

If you want to watch a film which was shot nearly completely with the wide angle lens, than watch Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil. It seems to suck you into the story.

In the meanwhile released longer version there are a few scenes not shot by Welles. I knew immediately which these were as they looked so completely different from the rest of the film.