The voice overdub thread


(lordradish) #1

As I watching more and more of these films, I’m struck by how much of a difference the English voice over can make or break a film. What makes it more interesting is I still don’t know what some of these actors real voices even sound like! A shitty overdub can make a good performance really bad. The whole concept is really strange if you think about it because you have two people simultaneously acting out the same character.

Anyone know anything about the actors who actually did the overdubbing? I think Milian used to do his own, because the voice sounds like him. It always seems like the same person did Fernando Sancho. Is that really him, perhaps? As someone joked on here once, there’s always the same drunk old guy voice. I notice often that childrens voices seem to be overdubbed by adults acting like children, and sounds awful (like that kid in CLint the Stranger).

One of the worst overdubs has to be that one in Django… the guy doing Nero sounds unbelievably fake, and unlike what Django even looks like he’d sound like. What are some of the worst overdubs you’ve heard? Worst performed, or mismatched?


(CactusCharlie) #2

The guy who dubbed the voice of old Jonathon in “Shoot The Living & Pray For The Dead” is terrible, i have also heard him on various other SW’s and he is awful on them too.

This one stands out for me as it spoils a great SW.


(Phil H) #3

Unfortunately, this was not an isolated problem in Nero films. His dubbed voice in Texas Adios is also pretty bad and, as you say, doesn’t fit the visual image of the character. It’s for this reason that I only watch Django in italian now. In fact I find myself watching more and more of these films that way. I don’t mind subtitles and a bad dub can really take the edge off an otherwise good film.


(Søren) #4

The English voice dub for Anthony Steffen in Some Dollars For Django is just plain awful. No emotion, no nothing.

Whenever I have the chance I always choose the Italian dub. Too many spaghettis are let down by awful English dubs.


(ENNIOO) #5

I do not mind most of the english dubs really, part of the charm of the films for me I guess.


(Bad Lieutenant) #6

Søren beat me to the punch on Some Dollars for Django. That dubbing job is indeed terrible.


(ecc) #7

Nero was dubbed by Tony Russel in DJANGO. Russel reportedly turned down the lead in FISTFUL OF DOLLARS because he thought the idea of an Italian western was ridiculous. I found the film unwatchable in English when I first saw it so I quickly switched over to the Italian track with subtitles.


(lordradish) #8

Yeah, I watched about 5 minutes of Django in English before I had to switch to Italian. Seems to be the consensus around here.


(Romaine Fielding) #9

I agree with Ennio. Part of the charm.

Like most people who watch these, I recognize the voices of the voice actors just like I recognize the faces of the screen actors . I’ve thought a lot about this in the past. I wonder who those actors were?
I’ve noticed on some of the Koch Media releases they have something at the end of the credit sequences that look like a list of the German voice actors and the parts they played. Wish they did that for English dubs.
It is weird how some films have more than one English dub (God Forvies…I Don’t; Bullet For The General)


(ecc) #10

A lot of the English dubbing voices I recognize from Italian horror films and gialli but DJANGO and THE GREAT SILENCE are films I can’t watch in English (the UK DVD has both English and Italian audio with English subtitles - I gladly parted with my Fantoma disc when I got the UK one). Others are quite good in English including BULLET FOR THE GENERAL. I’ve never seen the Italian language version of that one but I like that dub.

I understand that they are set in America but I watch them knowing they’re actually shot in Italy or Spain (with most interiors in Italy) but that in no way ruins the experience for me and the language itself is not an issue nor the dubbing usually but for a few performances. Usually the English dubs are closer to the on set dialogue since some of the actors act in English to facilitate dubbing but DJANGO just sounds better in Italian because of the dubbing of Franco Nero in the English version.


(scherpschutter) #11

[quote=“lordradish, post:1, topic:951”]As I watching more and more of these films, I’m struck by how much of a difference the English voice over can make or break a film. What makes it more interesting is I still don’t know what some of these actors real voices even sound like! A shitty overdub can make a good performance really bad. The whole concept is really strange if you think about it because you have two people simultaneously acting out the same character.

Anyone know anything about the actors who actually did the overdubbing? I think Milian used to do his own, because the voice sounds like him. It always seems like the same person did Fernando Sancho. Is that really him, perhaps? As someone joked on here once, there’s always the same drunk old guy voice. I notice often that childrens voices seem to be overdubbed by adults acting like children, and sounds awful (like that kid in CLint the Stranger).

One of the worst overdubs has to be that one in Django… the guy doing Nero sounds unbelievably fake, and unlike what Django even looks like he’d sound like. What are some of the worst overdubs you’ve heard? Worst performed, or mismatched?[/quote]

I grew up with English dubs, so I don’t mind them, even if they usually aren’t the best

Giuliano Gemma is from Rome, but he doesn’t have a Roman accent; Romans speak very loud and with a lot of phrase modulation.
Gemma has a rather low voice and speaks in a more monotonous way (so without much phrase modulation, but his Italian is always clear

The Italian used in spaghetti western, was a rather classic Italian; modern words and expressions were omitted and usually “Voi” (comparable to the French ‘Vous’) was used as the formal form of address, instead of the today more common “Lei”

Like Gemma Franco Nero’s Italian is clear and very understandable, but being from a more Northern region, he pronounces some sounds (especially consonants) in a slightly different, harsher way

Gianni Garko attended Drama school and has indeed a more lofty, more theatrical way of speaking his lines; it makes a very nice contrast with his laconic way of acting. He was born in Croatia but I suppose he went to Italy when he was very young, since he speaks the language without any discernable accent. His Italian sounds more like Nero’s than like Gemma’s.

like I pointed out in my TEPEPA REVIEW (is this a commercial break?) Milian refused to be dubbed for the first time for that film; he thought he had learned by that time enough Italian to speak his own lines. His idioms became known as ‘Spitaliano’, a funny combination of Spanish, Italian and fantasy language that contributed a lot to his popularity among students and (later) housewives. One of his best lines was:
Li mortacci tutti! which was supposed to mean 'Let’s kill them all’
Italian has two verbs for to kill (you’ll know them from film titles), ‘Ammazzare’ and ‘Uccidere’, but the verb Milian created, ‘Mortare’ doesn’t exist (in English mortare would be something like ‘to dead’, meaning to kill). Nearly everything in his sentence didn’t either exist or was in the wrong place, still everybody knew what he meant. Li mortacci tutti would be in English something like “Let 'm all dead!”

I don’t know who did Sancho’s voice in English, or any other dub
He was Spanish, so I suppose he did his own lines on the Spanish soundtrack
I have a few Spanish discs, but they also have Italian audio, and I always preferred it since my Spanish isn’t great
But I’ll check his voice and compare it to English and Italian tracks.


(Romaine Fielding) #12

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:11, topic:951”]I don’t know who did Sancho’s voice in English, or any other dub
He was Spanish, so I suppose he did his own lines on the Spanish soundtrack
I have a few Spanish discs, but they also have Italian audio, and I always preferred it since my Spanish isn’t great
But I’ll check his voice and compare it to English and Italian tracks.[/quote]

Posts like these are what make this forum interesting. That is great story about Milian. It totally fits into the character that I see in interviews with him in English.
Interesting, too, about Gemma, Garko etc

I wonder about Sancho dubbing his own…When would the guy have time to go to the dubbing studio? He was always making a movie !!


(lordradish) #13

scherpschutter, thank you so much for that big post of good information… so did Gemma and Garko do their own Italian overdubs? What about Steffen? I know that Nero did his English overdubs, did any other actors do that?


(scherpschutter) #14

I’ve never heard about someone else doing the Italian overdub for Gemma or Nero (not 100 % sure about Garko); Italian actors usually did their own dubs, but sometimes they had to be replaced because they couldn’t come to the studio. Bud Spencer was - if I’m not mistaking - replaced twice, for A reason to life and a reason to die, and (I think) Beyond the Law. Hill was replaced for (at least) one movie too, but I don’t remeber which one, probably Preparati la Bara.
Nero did some of his English overdubs, not all (see above some posts of others)

I don’t know anything about Steffen.
I’ll try to figure it out.