The Specialists / Gli specialisti (Sergio Corbucci, 1969)


(ENNIOO) #81

Not viewed this one yet…saving for a special occasion. The only Corbucci western I have not seen, and have a feeling it will be a favourite of mine.


(Dillinger) #82

Well then… go for it!

I think, it’s a great movie although many fans don’t like it that much. I think, I know why: Corbucci has made so many classics, he invented Django, he made one of my favourite movies of all time (Silence), he gave us two terrific westerns about the revolution. OK, compared to those, Gli Specialisti somehow is a bit weak. So, people tend to say, it’s not a good movie.

BUT compared to the many spags we know, it’s still great entertainment


(Silver) #83

Great review…interesting and very informative as always. I found the film to be interesting, but a little slow. Also didn’t like the hippies or the silly ending. Guess i should check out the other Corbuccis as i have only seen Companeros, aside from this one. Funnily i used to love Companeros when i was younger but have gone off it a lot, i suspect because at the end of the day, these revolution films really aren’t my thing, which is why i’ve never sought out The Mercenary. Also in recent years, Tomas Milian’s shameless hamming has started to irritate me a little (so for me, favourite performances of his are Django Kill and The Bounty Killer, where he is at least a bit more subdued). Really should pick up a copy of Great Silence though…


(ENNIOO) #84

Have you not seen Navajo Joe Silver ?


(Silver) #85

Ah yes… ::slight_smile: Kind of forgot about that one :-[ And of the ones i have seen, that’d be my favourite too…


(scherpschutter) #86

I received this PM from Breccio, reviewer of the French WesternMovies net:

http://forum.westernmovies.fr/ucp.php?i=pm&mode=view&f=0&p=41631

I’ll add this info to the review later today


(valenciano) #87

One question:
As I only realized after the review, the banker woman is also named pollicut, liek the bankers name in The great silence. You think that this one maybe was thought to be some kind of the great silence 2? I mean hud is also very quiet and excelent at shooting.
As far as I know the great silence was quite succesfull in France, and maybe Corbucci wanted to appeal to them again by choosing another french lead? What do you think about this?


(scherpschutter) #88

[quote=“valenciano, post:87, topic:243”]One question:
As I only realized after the review, the banker woman is also named pollicut, liek the bankers name in The great silence. You think that this one maybe was thought to be some kind of the great silence 2? I mean hud is also very quiet and excelent at shooting.
As far as I know the great silence was quite succesfull in France, and maybe Corbucci wanted to appeal to them again by choosing another french lead? What do you think about this?[/quote]

I don’t think it’s really meant to be a Great Silence 2, but Françoise Fabian actually was a good friend of Jean-Louis Trintignant, who advised her to take the part when it was offered to her. The bullet proof vest most probably is a remainder of Corbucci’s/Van Cleef’s original plans about a warfare specialist (and so maybe is the title, at least the French one). Still, it’s not completely impossible that Corbucci is referring to The Great Silence; it might be a joke, something like: this is what Silence should have had (and in the happy ending he has something to protect his arm, if i’m not mistaken). Like I said in the review, Hud is closer to Silence than to any other protagonist of Corbucci’s movies, that’s maybe why he chose a French actor again. It also secured him of a hit in France, because like I wrote, Halliday was and is an incredibly popular artist in the french speaking world.

And the Pollicut thing? I don’t know, I noticed it, but if it was deliberate, I guess it’s a kind of joke too. I don’t think the name ‘means’ anything; as far as i know it’s not the name of a famous banker, or something like that. But you never know.


(Stanton) #89

The Specialists was called the 3rd part of a mud & blood trilogy after Django and TGS.

I always thought the film would make more sense in Corbucci’s complete works if he was made between Django and TGS. But then it would have been a bit early for the hippie parts in 67.


(korano) #90

I really like this one. Corbucci does wonders with action but I wish there ws more of it. I thought the costume for Hud was really cool. I didn’t like the hippies because hey reminded more too much of thoe dirty hobbits from the ring movies. They are way too over the top. I always thought hippies wer really lax and not jupy, whiny little children. Great alpine locations. Sorta different for a Corbucci movie. But still good.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #91

Didn’t really like it that much. The youth gang almost ruined it for me. And Halladay is too damn slight of build to be a spaghetti hero! LOL Boy, get some meat on them bones! He looks anorexic and scrawny. Some good moments, and Corbucci’s direction is masterful as always. The scenery was breathtaking, where was it filmed? Didn’t look like Almeria. Overall I would give it a 5.5 out of 10.


(Stanton) #92

It was filmed in the alps at Cortina d’Ampezzo (where Sergio also shot The Great Silence) and in the Elios studios for the interiors and the town scenes.


(valenciano) #93

well eastwood is not build much differently he´s just taller. I thought halladay is convincing, but i never saw him as the singer he is known by many, because i guess im too young. Sometimes its hard to get an image out of your head, just saw Javier bardem in vicky cristina barcelona, and had to think of him in no country for old men all the time.
And yes the scenerey is great, maybe even better than in TGS, it just shows some great landscapes, and the cemtery is also wonderfull.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #94

Actually Eastwood was very lean but he did have a sinewy muscularity to him. Apparenlty he’s been lifting weights since he was a teenager. I read in a magazine in the 80’s that he did sets of 25 reps with 45 pound dumbell curls and has 4 percent body fat. Hallayday did a decent acting job though, I just thought he was too scrawny. Even his face looked skeletal.

Ah Stanton, thanks for the info. How could I not recognize it! Now that you mention it, the two movies are oddly similar in style and themes. The location actually does a better job of mimicking the American landscape than Almeria, which actually doesn’t really look like the southwestern states. Of course as an SW fan I gladly ignore this lack of authenticity.


(korano) #95

Since you say there similar in style and theme I have to step in just to say I agree.

Colonel, what is your opinion of Steffen. He’s just as srawny.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #96

Hey Korano.

Yeah Steffen is skinny and so is Garko, although he seemed to add some muscle in Lou Ferrigino’s Hercules.

I guess there is a difference between being lean and being scrawny. Steffen is lean. Hallyday is scrawny, like a weakling. Especially that scene with his shirt off he looks like a weakling. I can imagine someone like Mario Brega or Bud Spencer snapping him in half like a toothpick!


(Paco Roman) #97

I don’t think that somebody who looks like Halliday could be good in a fistfight. Maybe he would have a chance against Keira Knightly. Steffen and Eastwood are very slim too too but at least they have muscles and some power in their arms. On the other side he isn’t an easy target for bullets. :slight_smile:


(autephex) #98

i like him being scrawny. Makes him out of place, unusual- a characteristic which is, of course, one of the main reasons why i like spaghettis


(Angel Face) #99

I found this one to be a very nice surprise. An unusual film filled with Corbucci’s usual blend of off kilter characters and sudden bursts of violence. It was also nice to see screen tough guy, Mario Adorf again. The cinematography, as mentioned, is striking in its beauty.


(Phil H) #100

Corbucci is way off his best with this movie. Some nice stuff but not nearly good enough for a man who gave us Great Silence, Django, Companeros etc. This is what always frustrates me with Corbucci. Not a complete disaster but I expect better from one of the 3 Sergios.

I did like the scene where the whole town is stripped nude and lying in the street though and Mario Adorf was ok as the mexican bad guy. But I couldn’t help wondering how a band of Mexican Bandidos like this had got into an area clearly meant to be nowhere near the south west. :-\ I presume the italian alps are standing in for the rocky mountains here? Ah well.