The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (Raoul Walsh, 1958)


(ENNIOO) #1

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/The_Sheriff_of_Fractured_Jaw
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U.K actor Kenneth More heads down Wild West way from England on the hope of selling firearms. Has little luck at first but soon finds himself the sheriff of a town, and becomes friends with a very sexy looking Jayne Mansfield. More also finds time to become blood brothers with the local indians who help him out on occasion.

More plays his typical english man role in this lighthearted good natured western which you could watch on a sunday afternoon with the kids. Mansfield finds time to sing a few numbers and british actors Sid James and Robert Morley pop up in small roles.

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(Phil H) #2

I have indeed watched this on the odd sunday afternoon with the kids. Gentle stuff but always a pleasure for me as sunday afternoons always seemed to be Kenneth More territory on the telly when I was a kid myself. (Reach For the Sky, Genevieve, The Admirable Crichton et al)


(Phil H) #3

Watched this one again this afternoon.
Still a nostalgic pleasure for me. And always interesting to see those Spanish locations in a 50s western.


(Stanton) #4

Was the town build for this one used in later SWs?


(Phil H) #5

The town was built in Colmenar Viejo but I don’t think it is the same one we are more familiar with and suspect it was dismantled. But the landscapes around there and Hoyo de Manzanares are familiar.

The film itself, despite starring a quintessential English actor and some familiar old British faces, appears more of an American film than anything else and I suspect audiences at the time would have been surprised to know it wasn’t shot in the States. Walsh’s direction and a host of American actors add to that too of course.


(Stanton) #6

[quote=“Phil H, post:5, topic:1713”]The town was built in Colmenar Viejo but I don’t think it is the same one we are more familiar with and suspect it was dismantled. But the landscapes around there and Hoyo de Manzanares are familiar.

The film itself, despite starring a quintessential English actor and some familiar old British faces, appears more of an American film than anything else and I suspect audiences at the time would have been surprised to know it wasn’t shot in the States. Walsh’s direction and a host of American actors add to that too of course.[/quote]

I never would have suspected that Cold Mountain was shot in Romania. And I doubt that I thought as a child that the Winnetou movies were not shot in the USA.

I asked about the town because I read that it was build in the USA and then shipped to Europe, so I assumed that they took it back. So the infrastructure for the early SWs were soleyly build by the Spaniards, by the Marchent amigos shooting their early films.