Spaghetti-esque American (and other non-Italian) Westerns?


(The Great Duck) #1

So, I’ve seen some people on this boards say some American westerns made in the late '60s and the early '70s, such as Hang 'Em High or High Plains Drifter, tried to copy the Italian spaghetti westerns. So, I was wondering, can anyone think of any other American (and other non-Italian) westerns that have a similar feel to that of the Italian spaghettis (even though I don’t expect most of them to be that good, but who knows :smiley: ) ?


(Stanton) #2

I don’t thimnk that Us westerns were trying to copy SWs. I think they simply ignored them.

The exception is of course Eaatwood. But Hang em’ High is a typical 67 Us western with about zero SW influence, and High Plains Drifter is on one hand a comment on SWs, and the directing shows some SW influence in a negative form, but on the other hand it is also not too close to typical SWs.

l always thought that Eastwood’s westerns are at their weakest when they are closest to Leone. Don Siegel was the better “teacher” for Eastwood the filmmaker.


(scherpschutter) #3

I have been restudying Pale Rider last week (the article is almost ready); both High Plains drifter and Pale Rider are comments on SWs, but also on American westerns (HPD: in the first place High Noon, PR: in the first place Shane) and Eastwood’s part in the history of the genre.

I agree that Don Siegel was his major influence; as a film maker he’s also closer to Siegel than to Leone, but he found his own style. Personally I’m not really a fan of his directional style, but most of his films (and certainly the westerns) have several good scenes. I still like Pale Rider best.


(ENNIOO) #4

In the 70’s when alot of Spaghetti westerns were introducing comedy elements, alot of U.S westerns were often going the more violent cynical way. So for me U.S westerns of the 70’s are far more interesting on the whole than 70’s Spaghetti westerns. Not necessary in the Spaghetti style these 70’s U.S westerns, but well worth checking out films like; Chato’s Land, Ulzana’s Raid.


(scherpschutter) #5
In the 70's when alot of Spaghetti westerns were introducing comedy elements, alot of U.S westerns were often going the more violent cynical way. So for me U.S westerns of the 70's are far more interesting on the whole than 70's Spaghetti westerns. Not necessary in the Spaghetti style these 70's U.S westerns, but well worth checking out films like; Chato's Land, Ulzana's Raid.

Agreed. Several westerns made in the late sixties, early seventies were influenced by the violent nature of the spaghetti westerns; The Wild Bunch is often called an ‘answer’ to the Italian western; among other things, it probably can be interpreted that way, but that doesn’t mean that it looks or feels like a spaghetti western. I don’t see much spaghetti in the movie. The death walk maybe. The films you mention neither. Nor do those American or British westerns that were shot in Spain, like The Hunting Party, Shalako, 100 Rifles, Chato’s Land, Cannon for Cordoba, etc. Again: they were influenced by the violence of the SWs, but didn’t look like them at all. Ironically some of Clint’s and Lee’s movies that were shot in the US or Mexico occasionally have some spaghetti western feel, notably Two Mules for Sister Sarah and Barquero.


(ENNIOO) #6

Yes always felt that re Two Mules for Sister Sarah, the Morricone score may help a bit aswell.


(kit saginaw) #7

I’m not sure if The Quick And The Dead imitates SW’s or not. I never quite got the point of it.

An homage to gimmick-y fast-draw scenes… ? I think that’s what it tries to be. Both SW’s and American ones had them.


(Bill san Antonio) #8

Mexican westerns from 70’s are more spaghetti like than the US westerns of that time. Tunco Maclovio is a good example.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #9

I think Quick and the Dead imitates SWs in that the characters are over the top and gimmicky.