Recycled Footage in Spaghetti Westerns


(Bill san Antonio) #1

On the Third Day Arrived the Crow
-Whole gun battle in town at the end is the same one as in another Crea winner Finders Killers. Few shots of main actors are added to make it look like it’s they who are fighting the bandits.

Bounty Killer for Trinity
-Two bandit brother are the same one as in Black Killer and many shots have been re-used in Bounty Killer…

Lobo the Bastard
-Mexicans are having a party in the courtyard of a ranch. This scene is also in some other film I just can’t remember which film it was right now.

There’s also some more I’ve noticed in Fidani films (obviously) and some others.
Have you noticed more?


(Reverend Danite) #2

[quote=“Bill san Antonio, post:1, topic:794”]Bounty Killer for Trinity
-Two bandit brother are the same one as in Black Killer and many shots have been re-used in Bounty Killer…[/quote]
Without me going off to look … are these the ones dressed in red and green - I thought I’d seen them before?
I wanna find me one …


(Bill san Antonio) #3

Yep, these guys:

(image from Shobary’s sitehttp://spaghettiwesterns.1g.fi/)


(Silver Wolf) #4

[quote=“Bill san Antonio, post:1, topic:794”]On the Third Day Arrived the Crow
-Whole gun battle in town at the end is the same one as in another Crea winner Finders Killers. Few shots of main actors are added to make it look like it’s they who are fighting the bandits.[/quote]
Not only that gun battle is from Finders Killers but everything else happening during the final 25 minutes as well.

Seven Devils on a Horseback is supposed to have scenes from The Law of Violence but I didn’t notice any, possibly because I haven’t seen The Law of Violence in years. Both by Gianni Crea again.

Go Away! Trinity Has Arrived in Eldorado is just re-used/alternate/leftover scenes from various Demofilo Fidani films cut together + new dubbing + some new scenes. This film (credited to Joe D’Amato) was mostly made in cutting room during few days. Bandits falling from rooftops were taken from Lobo the Bastard, if I remember right.

His Name Was King has scenes from Vengeance, the ones with Harrison riding from one place to another, mostly. No close-ups of characters are used.

Luigi Batzella’s God Is My Colt has scenes from Even Django Has His Price. Stagecoach hold-up, attack to mexican village, big gun battle at the villa and scenes with bandits playing poker in a cave… at least! Some say that scenes from his own Paid in Blood are also used and that Paid in Blood has scenes from Even Django… but as I have not seen Paid in Blood I can’t confirm this.

Roberto Mauri’s Django… Adios is just 50 minutes(!) or so worth of scenes from Django’s Here, Pay or Die! cut together with few short scenes from his own Wanted Sabata + some new stuff. Since I have not seen Django’s Here… I can’t confirm this but it looks like a cut-together film alright. His Corte marziale is a similar case using scenes from …e lo chiamarono Spirito Santo & Bada alla tua pelle, Spirito Santo! + new scenes + new dub. Wanted Sabata has one scene which also apears in Django… Adios which doen’t fit either film so it is likely to be from Django’s Here, Pay or Die! Spirito santo e le cinque magnifiche canaglie has one scene with bandits trying to stop wagons with dynamite which has very different picture quality and shooting locations, so it’s likely to be taken from some other film.


(Bill san Antonio) #5

There’s also another Fidani/Crea recycling in Lobo the Bastard. Scene where Gordon Mitchell is wrestling in the mud is also used in Crea’s Finders Killers.


(Bad Lieutenant) #6

I’d like to see Porno erotico western, which was edited from Death played the flute. Anybody who has seen it?


(Reverend Danite) #7

Yes - at last. ;D

It’s only taken nearly 6 months …

I was just going thru’ a few maybes for this eve, checking quality and thought … hang about - I’ve seen bits of this before recently ???.
I did say that I thought [i]Paid in Blood/Quelle Sporche Anime Dannate/i was pretty poor, seems it must have been made along side [i]God is my Colt .45/La Colt Era Il Suo Dio/i.
Both were directed by Luigi Batzella (under one name or another), but Colt .45 gets Joe D’Amato on the directorial credits as well, according to our database? (I’ll check video credits later.)
Anyway - same cast from what I can see, poor li’l Krista Nell gets smacked around in identical footage but to different dialogue in both - plus there’s the same shootout and prospector footage in both. I gotta (did) say that PIB was one of the most ‘ho-hum’ mundane spaghettis I’d ever watched. I’m hoping Colt .45’ll be better!

[Edit: No mention of D’Amato on Colt .45 credits - just Dean Jones (who is Batzella). Weisser has PIB as done by Solvay (Batzella) - tho’ the credits on this version have Gino Turini ( presumably Solvay/Batzella) as Director - confusing ??? - this is getting into Dick Spitfire/trainspotting :stuck_out_tongue: territory!] :wink:


(Reverend Danite) #8

Only Weisser - from what I can glean … so probably bunkum?
[Edit - actually I’ve seen a poster for said film so it does exist - but I’m not sure it looks like it’s come from DPTF.]


(Durango) #9

Bury Them Deep
-bank robbery and town shootout lifted from Taste of Killing (Gusto per Uccidere).

El Zorro Justiciero (Zorro the Executioner?)
-train robbery lifted from Seven Guns for the Macgregors.

I’ve noticed some more I think, but I can’ recollect.


(Chris_Casey) #10

[quote=“Durango, post:9, topic:794”]Bury Them Deep
-bank robbery and town shootout lifted from Taste of Killing (Gusto per Uccidere).[/quote]

I was going to mention this one, too! Apart from those two major scenes…there are lots and lots of transitional landscape and riding sequences that are lifted from PER IL GUST DI UCCIDERE in BURY THEM DEEP, as well.
I sort of dislike BURY THEM DEEP just because they stole so much from the other film!


(Durango) #11
His Name Was King has scenes from Vengeance, the ones with Harrison riding from one place to another, mostly. No close-ups of characters are used.

His Name Was King also has scenes from Chapaqua/Gold of the Bravados: intro credit sequence with the gunsight, and the short gunfight between Mexican bandits and police. They shot footage of Harrison watching this happen from afar. Part of the instrumental music was also reused from Chapaqua (great score by Bacalov btw).

Adding this to the long riding scenes from Vengeance (easily recognizable since the scenes are sepia-colored), Romitelli shot maybe 60 min of new footage for this already short movie (75 min). The only redeeming factors are Harrison & Kinski, a good theme song with a great sixties vibe, and some good gunfights.


(Bill san Antonio) #12

Found interesting info from swwb.

Stop me if you’ve heard this one. A fan who goes by the name of “Sartana” on the French westernmovies.fr bulletin board has made quite a find. Here are three late entries into the genre (from the listings in WESTERN ALL’ITALIANA vol. 3):
  1. WANTED SABATA (1970), dir. Roberto Mauri, starring Brad Harris, Vassili Karis
  2. ARRIVA DURANGO: PAGA O MUORI (1971), dir. Roberto Bianchi Montero, starring Brad Harris, Jose’ Torres (English title: DURANGO IS COMING, PAY OR DIE).
  3. SEMINÒ LA MORTE… LO CHIAMAVANO IL CASTIGO DI DIO (1972), dir. “Robert Johnson” (Roberto Mauri), starring Brad Harris, Vassili Karis, Jose’ Torres (English title: DEATH IS SWEET FROM THE SOLDIER OF GOD).

What “Sartana” found out: Movie # 3 is entirely made out of pieces from Movies # 1 and 2. A rough editing, a new dubbing, and presto change-o, you’ve got a new plot (albeit an incoherent one).
According to “Sartana”, there’s not a new shot in Movie # 3 — only the dialogue, the editing and the music are new.


(Jamie) #13

I love the His Name Was King theme song! That’s the jam.


(Romaine Fielding) #14

[quote=“Chris_Casey, post:10, topic:794”]I was going to mention this one, too! Apart from those two major scenes…there are lots and lots of transitional landscape and riding sequences that are lifted from PER IL GUST DI UCCIDERE in BURY THEM DEEP, as well.
I sort of dislike BURY THEM DEEP just because they stole so much from the other film![/quote]

I was watching the start of Bury Them Deep last night and noticed that the opening sequence in which a stagecoach is pursued and robbed by a band of outlaws is taken from Starblack (from about minute 34 of that film). You can easily tell when the recycled footage ends and the other footage begins. I don’t know if Starblack stole it from some other film. So it seems that Bury Them Deep stole from more than one film?!? Both Taste For Killing and Starblack are from 1966.

Chris had you noticed this too?


(Silver) #15

I think i mentioned this once in another thread but i’m pretty sure that the flashbacks of a dying man in They Call Him Veritas were taken from Red Blood, Yellow Gold.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #16

[quote=“Bill san Antonio, post:1, topic:794”]Bounty Killer for Trinity
-Two bandit brother are the same one as in Black Killer and many shots have been re-used in Bounty Killer…[/quote]

I just watched Bounty hunter in Trinity and thought I was having Deja Vu. It seems half of the footage in that movie came from Black Killer!


(axl_foley_01) #17

[quote=“Reverend Danite, post:7, topic:794”]I did say that I thought [i]Paid in Blood/Quelle Sporche Anime Dannate/i was pretty poor, seems it must have been made along side [i]God is my Colt .45/La Colt Era Il Suo Dio/i.
Both were directed by Luigi Batzella (under one name or another), but Colt .45 gets Joe D’Amato on the directorial credits as well, according to our database? (I’ll check video credits later.)
Anyway - same cast from what I can see, poor li’l Krista Nell gets smacked around in identical footage but to different dialogue in both - plus there’s the same shootout and prospector footage in both. I gotta (did) say that PIB was one of the most ‘ho-hum’ mundane spaghettis I’d ever watched. I’m hoping Colt .45’ll be better![/quote]

For “La colt era il suo dio” (http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Colt_era_il_suo_Dio,_La) Batzella or the producers took the footage of his former movies “Anche per Django le carogne hanno un prezzo” and “Quelle sporche anime dannate”, edited it to a new movie and made a new synchronisation - so “La colt era il suo dio” is really just recycled. There isn´t any new sequence, that wasn´t part of the former movies.

Maybe that schould also be updated in the database - the facts are also mentioned in Bruckners “Für ein paar Leichen mehr”, if you can´t compare the three movies…


(JonathanCorbett) #18

Down with Your Hands… You Scum!, Beyond the Frontiers of Hate and, on the comedy side, Halleluja to Vera Cruz are also worth mentioning.

The first five movies listed below are the most extreme, and consequently interesting, examples. It is worth noting that both Django… Adios! and God Is My Colt.45 were produced in 1972 by Virginia Cinematografica, the company of Gunman of One Hundred Crosses and Black Killer. The last three on the list belong to the comedy subgenre.

Django… Adios! a.k.a. Death Is Sweet From The Soldier Of God
God Is My Colt.45
Court Martial
A Bounty Killer for Trinity
Down with Your Hands… You Scum! a.k.a. The Django Story
Beyond the Frontiers of Hate
Bury Them Deep
On the Third Day Arrived the Crow
Seven Devils on Horseback
The Avenger, Zorro
His Name was King
Halleluja to Vera Cruz
Run Men, Eldorado is Coming to Trinity
They Call Him Veritas


(JonathanCorbett) #19

The company was co-founded by Oscar Santaniello who was also involved in Bury Them Deep, Down with Your Hands You Scum and A Bounty Killer for Trinity, so one might consider him the unopposed king of this kind of productions.

This is incorrect, SWs with these characteristics don’t exist (see also Reply #12).