R.I.P. Legends Lost but Remembered


(Phil H) #1

Thought I’d start this thread as a general place to mention the passing of some well known faces who are not neccesarily significant to spaghettis or westerns in general. Just folk who have passed on and deserve a mention.

So first on the gone but not forgotten roll is Dave Dee who sadly passed on this week. For those not familiar, Dave Dee fronted a british pop band from the sixties called, bizarrely, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich. They had a number of top 10 hits here in the UK but are probably best remembered for ‘The Legend of Xanadu’ from 1968. A kitsch classic from the 60s in my opinion and one which could easily have appeared as a spaghetti theme tune maybe.

Anyway, here’s a youtube link to the man in action. R.I.P. Dave.


(Silvanito) #2

Good initiative Phil, “something to do with death” concerns everybody


(Lode) #3

I heard in in the radio. Rest in peace…


(ENNIOO) #4

I am sure this thread will be alot longer in a few months.


(Reverend Danite) #5

I’m off to bury a mate of mine in an hour or so. You probably don’t know him, although as Washington Green’s best selling artist, it’s at least possible you might.
He was a very talented artist and illustrator, and a good friend who I’ve known since art college days in the early 80s, who died way too young. Although much of his work could be brazenly commercial - (not that there’s anything wrong with that) - with Rothko-ish cats and dogs - such as the attached The good, the bad and the ugly - being a stock-in-trade, he was a genuinely creative and gentle individual that would produce work that reflected other sides and facets of his always enquiring mind. To balance the outwardly commercial pieces, he would also produce exquisite sculptural work that sometimes reflected an Indian influence, or at other times, pure abstraction.
So forgive me for giving him some space here, and in case I appear a trifle squiffy should I be here later on.
Whether you knew him or not, and if you’re partaking of a small libation later, may I ask you to raise your glass and drink to Gov - believe me chaps, he was one of the good guys!

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(Phil H) #6

Consider the glass raised Rev.
From the looks of the work you have posted he looked like a talented individual indeed. I particularly like the sculpture in the middle pic. Beautiful.


(scherpschutter) #7

Bad day to quit drinking then, as Loyd Bridges would say in that ZAZ movie …

Beautiful work, yes
The sculpture in the middle has a Brancusi like smoothness, at the same time simple and enigmatic

The GBU piece somehow reminds me of Chagall, although the style is different. Don’t know what it is exactly, maybe that yellow and black dog face.


(ENNIOO) #8

Patrick Mc Goohan has passed away, and of course starred in one Spaghetti:

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hls8g79toC_XSUxWXSHcbe8n9ergD95N1HBG0


(Phil H) #9

[quote=“ENNIOO, post:8, topic:1512”]Patrick Mc Goohan has passed away, and of course starred in one Spaghetti:

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hls8g79toC_XSUxWXSHcbe8n9ergD95N1HBG0[/quote]

That is really sad.
I loved McGoohan as a youngster when he was in Dangerman and of course The Prisoner. (Great theme tune to Dangerman by the way)
He wasn’t in enough films but I remember him well as the Warden in Escape From Alcatraz with Clint Eastwood. Of course he made a Spaghetti appearance in A Genius, Two Partners and a Dupe but his best work was on British TV I think.

R.I.P. indeed.


(scherpschutter) #10

Both Dangerman and The prisoner where very popular in Holland when I was a boy
I’ve seen parts of both shows, but don’t remeber too much of them

I saw a double installment (2X50 minutes) of Dangeman a couple of years ago on French TV
It wasn’t bad, a lot of action, and McCoohan was a very good lead
I liked him in A Genius etc. And now Phil mentions it, he was great in Escape from Alcatraz


(Søren) #11

He was also the bad guy in more than one Columbo episode as far as I remember. Other than that I only remember him from the aforementioned The Prisoner and of course from Nobody’s The Greatest aka The Genius aka whatever. R. I. P.


(Romaine Fielding) #12

[quote=“Reverend Danite, post:5, topic:1512”]I’m off to bury a mate of mine in an hour or so. You probably don’t know him, although as Washington Green’s best selling artist, it’s at least possible you might.
He was a very talented artist and illustrator, and a good friend who I’ve known since art college days in the early 80s, who died way too young. Although much of his work could be brazenly commercial - (not that there’s anything wrong with that) - with Rothko-ish cats and dogs - such as the attached The good, the bad and the ugly - being a stock-in-trade, he was a genuinely creative and gentle individual that would produce work that reflected other sides and facets of his always enquiring mind. To balance the outwardly commercial pieces, he would also produce exquisite sculptural work that sometimes reflected an Indian influence, or at other times, pure abstraction.
So forgive me for giving him some space here, and in case I appear a trifle squiffy should I be here later on.
Whether you knew him or not, and if you’re partaking of a small libation later, may I ask you to raise your glass and drink to Gov - believe me chaps, he was one of the good guys![/quote]

Sorry to hear about your friend Rev. If he was a friend of yours, he was a friend of mine.


(ENNIOO) #13

Perhaps more relevant to people in the U.K, but Tony Hart the childrens T.V presenter has died at the age of 83. He was a very pleasant man indeed.


(Tom B.) #14

People we see in films or grow up with seeing on TV mean as much to as personal friends and family. Many are closer and have a larger effect on our lives then aunts, uncles, cousins, brothers and sisters. When we lose someone close to us it hurts no matter what. Keep there memories alive in your hearts and minds and they will never really die. Sorry to hear of your loss Rev. RIP :’(


(Reverend Danite) #15

I remember him well from doing his arty stuff for kids on t.v. on a program called Vision On. He was an inspiration, and turned a lot of kids onto arts and crafts. He wasn’t annoyingly ‘wacky’ like today’s presenters seem to have to be - but a natural - gentle and sincere - and an excellent craftsman himself. RIP

And thanks for those words guys. I managed to get hold of a print of Gov’s GBU to stick on my studio wall, to give the place a bit of class.


(Phil H) #16

Tony Hart was a treasure from a bygone age of television. Quietly talented middle aged men don’t find their way onto kids TV anymore. A shame, but Tony’s passing is an even bigger one. His show, Vision On, as the Rev pointed out was an inspiration to lots of art minded kids in the 60s and 70s but it was also ground breaking as being the first show I am aware of that featured sign language for the deaf. Thanks for posting about this Ennioo, I hadn’t heard this news and will definitely be raising a glass in his honour this evening.


(Silver) #17

Very sad to hear this :frowning: Way back in the early 80’s when i was at middle school, the whole 4th year sent in pictures to Take Hart, and only two (one of which was mine) were picked to be shown in the gallery. Never got the damn thing back though of course :smiley:


(ENNIOO) #18

I loved his shows, and pleasant people like this are sometimes hard to find these days.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #19

When was “Vision On” televised, i may be a little young (35) for that, i remember “Take Hart” though.

…and that character Morph.

R.I.P.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #20

me and some of my pals used to love ripping the piss out of “shit” pictures that appeared in the gallery, there was always a few :smiley: