"Paella" westerns


(korano) #1

It seems to me, that paella westerns have a distinct feel to them. Maybe a very cheap feel. I am curious about these films. Since the spanish participation in this genre is usually as providers of locations. But when they actually produce thereown western, it is something kind of interesting. What do you guys think of these Paella westerns?


(Yodlaf Peterson) #2

Even though he’s actually Argentinian would you count the westerns of Leon Klimovsky as Spanish westerns?


(korano) #3

[quote=“Yodlaf Peterson, post:2, topic:1290”]Even though he’s actually Argentinian would you count the westerns of Leon Klimovsky as Spanish westerns?[/quote]If they were produced by Spaniards, then I consider them Paella’s. Were his Spanish produced? Haven’t seen his films but he has a bad reputation.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #4

I think some were Spanish and some Italian.

I think “Ballad of a bounty killer” and “Rattler kid” are Spanish productions and the others such as “Reverend Colt” are Italian.

I may be wrong though.


(korano) #5

Anyway, what do you think of them?


(Yodlaf Peterson) #6

I thought Ballad of a bounty killer wasn’t too bad, Rattler kid on the other hand was pretty bad.


(korano) #7

[quote=“Yodlaf Peterson, post:6, topic:1290”]I thought Ballad of a bounty killer wasn’t too bad, Rattler kid on the other hand was pretty bad.[/quote]Whatis the alternate title for ballad of a bounty killer? I ask because I want to know if itis the same as death played the flute.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #8

“Death played a flute” is a.k.a. “Requiem a bounty killer / hunter”

Another alternative title for “Ballad of a bounty killer” is “Two thousand dollars for Coyote” or “Dos mil dólares por Coyote” for it’s original Spanish title.


(korano) #9

Didn;t know that was Spainsh produced. Do you know where it was shot? Shobary said it appeared to be a combination of china africa and spain! That purked my interest.


(korano) #10

Does anyone else have any comments? Do these films have a distinctive feel? Are there any big budgeted ones? Any good ones? Very interested to know.


(Dillinger) #11

Is Bounty Killer a paelly western? It’s by Eugenio Martin and the original title is Spanish (El Precio de un hombre). If it was so, this would be my favourite “paella”.

Many paellas are quite cheap, Rattler Kid is a superb example - really one of my least favourite westerns.

Cut-throats nine is also quite cheap, although it IS a great one.

So I think you can’t saym all peallas are creepy, but most of them are low-budget ones.


(Sebastian) #12

sometimes i dont know how to tell them apart from SWs though… i mean, it’s not always easy to draw a line.

bounty killer is definitely a SW to me, i mean… well…


(korano) #13

Why is Bullet for Sandoval often called a Paella or Spanish Western? Just because it has a Spanish director? To my knowledge, it is an Italian western with Spanish cooperation.

Isn’t Duel in the Eclipse a Paella?


(Stanton) #14

No spanish producers for Death Played a Flute, according to my informations. And it was obviously shot in Italy alone. Partly in G. Mitchell’s cheap Cave studios and in typical Fidani landscapes.


(Julio_Alberto) #15

Son todos spaghetti westerns, querer crear un nuevo subgenero no es bueno.
Pese a ser películas rodadas por directores españoles y tener más dinero español en la producción (aunque casi siempre eran coproducciones), normalmente tienen el mismo espiritu que sus hermanas italianas.

They are all spaghetti westerns, wanting to create a new SUBGENUS is not good.
Despite being films by directors from Spain and Spanish have more money in the production (although they were almost always co-productions), usually have the same spirit that their Italian sisters.

(Sorry for my English)


(Stanton) #16

Yes, I also don’t see any reason to distinguish between Spags and Paellas. All one soup for me.


(scherpschutter) #17

Spaghetti + paella = soup

David Copperfield will need quite a marvellous trick to outshine our own Mama Miracoli Minestrone