Non-North American set Westerns


(korano) #1

I sometimes watch westerns for the fact that some are not set in North America. Man Pride and Vengeance for example. Do you guys know of any westernsthat are NOT set in North America?


(Phil H) #2

I know not everyone agrees but for me a north american setting is a prerequisite for a film to be considered a western.


(korano) #3

I’ll try to respect your opinion but what about The Propsition?


(Phil H) #4

It’s Australian. Therefore, for me, not a western.
I understand the arguments to consider such a film a western (themes, style etc) but these things are not the sole reserve of that particular genre and I think it is possible for a film to be influenced or shaped by the western without actually being one.
Everyone has their own definitions of course, and each to their own. But in my understanding if it’s a western it needs to be set in the west. A highly mythologised west, but the west all the same.


(korano) #5

OK.


(Goodfella) #6

I agree that for a film to truley be a “western” it must take place in North America.

In fact in my eyes its still not really a “western” unless it takes place in the American Frontier during the mid to late 1800s. Ill can make exceptions for Americans going on the run and leaving the U.S. though. Early 1900s can work but its not really my cup of tea.

Anyway a film about non Americans taking place elsewhere than the American forntier does not equal a true “western” IMO. But at the same time there are films very much in the tradition of the western that really cannot be considered any but. Like the proposition for example. What else could it be called really?

Speaking of The Proposition. Thats actually one of the best films, let alone “westerns”, of recent years and I highly reccomend it on the off chance that you havent seen it.


(Silvanito) #7

“westerns” not set in the wild west are “semi-westerns” perhaps? ???


(scherpschutter) #8

The Germans among us could possibly call them ‘Schwesterns’


(AceHigh) #9

What about "Quigley Down Under?’ I consider it a western even though the majority of the film is set in the Outback.


(korano) #10

[quote=“Lindberg, post:7, topic:1320”]“westerns” not set in the wild west are “semi-westerns” perhaps? ???[/quote]How about Neo-Western.

And yes, I consider Quigley Down Under to be a western.


(Stanton) #11

There are some “true” westerns set in Canada like North West Mounted Police or Pony Soldier or Saskatchewan.

And don’t forget all the westerns set in Mexico, and I’m not talking about the revolution based ones, which are a different story.


(Paco Roman) #12

What about Outback Westerns?

IMO Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada is something like a neo-western. ???


(Phil H) #13

[quote=“stanton, post:11, topic:1320”]There are some “true” westerns set in Canada like North West Mounted Police or Pony Soldier or Saskatchewan.

And don’t forget all the westerns set in Mexico, and I’m not talking about the revolution based ones, which are a different story.[/quote]

I love it. Now we are arguing about geography :smiley: :smiley:
By my understanding North America would mean the north american continent which would include Canada and Mexico. So I’m cool with those locations. As for Australia though…not for me. I can understand Quigley Down Under being a fair example but that is still just a story about a western character in a foreign setting. By that criteria Hidalgo is a western even though it is set in Arabia. Even that stretch doesn’t work for The Proposition. That is about Brits and Aussies in Australia so no more a western than Ned Kelly for me. But then some would include that too.
At the end of the day everyone has their own criteria and it is without doubt a genre that has many grey areas for definition. But if it’s a good film, who cares right?


(Stanton) #14

Both Ned Kelly films have only some western aspects, but The Proposition looks and feels very much like one, and is one.

Quigley Down Under only partly, I call these type half-westerns.

(Get Mean and the Silent Stranger are seen in this light as half-Spagies)


(scherpschutter) #15

Well, hopefully you all now this example of inductive reasoning:

If a bird looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck

It’s nearly always relevant
A friend of mine has a Volvo, a very dangerous car (for other road-users) and when I like to tease him a little, I say things like:

Looks like a tank, drives like a tank, feels like a tank. Conclusion: a tank


(Phil H) #16

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:15, topic:1320”]Well, hopefully you all now this example of inductive reasoning:

If a bird looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck

It’s nearly always relevant
A friend of mine has a Volvo, a very dangerous car (for other road-users) and when I like to tease him a little, I say things like:

Looks like a tank, drives like a tank, feels like a tank. Conclusion: a tank[/quote]

This is, of course, a good analogy. But only if we all agree on what constitutes a duck! :smiley:
Just because it’s a bird that swims doesn’t neccesarily mean it’s a duck. Could be a goose.


(Stanton) #17

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:15, topic:1320”]Well, hopefully you all now this example of inductive reasoning:

If a bird looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck[/quote]

Again: Why a duck?


(Stanton) #18

[quote=“Phil H, post:13, topic:1320”]I love it. Now we are arguing about geography :smiley: :smiley:
By my understanding North America would mean the north american continent which would include Canada and Mexico. [/quote]

Blasphemy


(Phil H) #19

Yeah. Why a no chicken?


(Goodfella) #20

But if a film takes place outside “The West” it can be argued that it doesnt really look, swim or quack like a duck.