Hombre


(cigar joe) #1

One of my favs, Paul Newman, almost a Spaghetti Western character, you can just imagine the Morricone jew’s harp twangs as he delivers his one liners. Also Richard Boone is superb as the villan that just oozes menace, also has Cameron Mitchel, and Martin Balsam.


(Sebastian) #2

its after a novel by Elmore Leonard, right?


(cigar joe) #3

Yea based on an Elmore Leonard novel, its even got a three way shootout at the end, check it out sometime.


(WalkinEagle) #4

I dont like it much. Despite it having a very strong plot it didnt really build up the main characters all that well…they kinda look rehashed from countless other movies


(Phantom Stranger) #5

Not one of my favorites, but I do enjoy it. And Richard Boone was a great villian


(Colonel_Kurz) #6

I wouldn’t say it was great, but it’s definitely good. Newman carries the pic, but the story’s not that bad either. For some reason, I was especially impressed by the part where the woman gets caught in the middle of the days long standoff.


(DutchEngstrom) #7

Paul Newman as a blue-eyed Indian. Normally, that kind of mis-casting would have me chuckling, but Newman’s personality over comes this indiscretion. This is an ensemble style western, where diverse personalities are forced together in a claustrophobic setting. Director Martin Ritt lays the social-injustices theme on, a bit thick at times, but there’s enough action to get you thru the preachiness. Richard Boone steals the show, as a villain who starts off in complete control, but is foiled at every turn by Newman. Kind of reminds me of Alan Rickman in Die Hard. Good support from Frederick March, Diane Cilento, Martin Balsam, Cameron Mitchell and Barbara Rush. This film is a decent watch, overall.


(Stanton) #8

Newman doesn’t play an indian, he’s a white who was grown up by indians, so that he thinks like them. So, no problem with his blue eyes.

I like this film very much. Ritt’s best film.

And a great charismatic performance by Newman, often without playing.
But all the acting is great in this film (especially Boone).

Another fascinating point is the photgraphy (by James Wong Howe) and especially the often breathtaking use of landscape. You’ll never find locations and images like this in a SW.

My only complaint is the sometimes a bit pretensious dialogue.


(DutchEngstrom) #9

[quote=“stanton, post:8, topic:102”]Newman doesn’t play an indian, he’s a white who was grown up by indians, so that he thinks like them. So, no problem with his blue eyes.

I like this film very much. Ritt’s best film.

And a great charismatic performance by Newman, often without playing.
But all the acting is great in this film (especially Boone).

Another fascinating point is the photgraphy (by James Wong Howe) and especially the often breathtaking use of landscape. You’ll never find locations and images like this in a SW.

My only complaint is the sometimes a bit pretensious dialogue.[/quote] He’s portrayed as an Indian at the beginning. You only learn the background on the character later. What I want to know, is how Newman goes from black hair to silvery in one haircut? lol


(Stanton) #10

I never have noticed his changing hair color.

So maybe it wasn’t that obvious, and I think it’s only an unimportant detail.


(DutchEngstrom) #11

[quote=“stanton, post:10, topic:102”]I never have noticed his changing hair color.

So maybe it wasn’t that obvious, and I think it’s only an unimportant detail.[/quote] Newman got razzed a bit about this movie, for what I mentioned, but not as much as for The Silver Chalise.