Day of Anger / I giorni dell’ira (Tonino Valerii, 1967)


(fendertubeguy) #121

Besides Leone, this is my favorite SW!!!


(JonathanCorbett) #122

The sheriff was played by Giorgio Gargiullo (on the centre in Giuseppe Vari’s Un buco in fronte [Tedder], on the right in Bruno Corbucci’s Isabella duchessa dei diavoli [district prefect]), and not by Nino Nini as reported by various sources.


(Lode) #123

My (german) DVD-Review of the new Arthaus-DVD is online. Have fun: http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Der_Tod_ritt_dienstags_DVD_review


(sartana1968) #124

without doupt a masterpiece 4.5/5


(scherpschutter) #125

Great work, Lode, an excellent read

I have the Italian DVD, audio isn’t great on that disc either, it’s also rather low on volume
I’ll load up a few screenshots later


(scherpschutter) #126

Would have loaded up those screenshots, but I can’t find the DVD …


(scherpschutter) #127

Here are the screenshots from the Italian disc (Medusa)

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[URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/15/vlcsnap2012021614h46m53.png/]http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/812/vlcsnap2012021614h42m30.png/

It’s not a bad DVD, but ocasionally the image is quite soft (look at the second screenshot) and colours could have been a bit more vivid
There’s room for improvement, and according to what Lode said about the German disc in his review of it, this disc actually is an improvement (though not in relation to the Italian audio).

There’s only Italian audio (low on volume) and Italian subs (HOH)


(sartana1968) #128

looks like the wild east trasfer


(Lode) #129

Thanks for the screenshots, Simon. The good thing here is that the subs are literally on screen. The german DVD has the subtitles on the black bar which is somehow annoying on a widescreen TV.


(scherpschutter) #130

I prefer to have one line in the black bar, one in the screen. I usually don’t need the subs, at least not for English audio tracks, but in the case of German, French or Italian audio I activate them for those parts of the dialogue I don’t understand very well. For a Corbucci movie you watch with Italian audio, it’s useful to have subs (preferably Italian HOH). A movie like Day of Anger is not too difficult to follow in a foreign language.


(Lode) #131

It is for me. Especially in Italian which I speak as much as Japanese, Mandarin or Hungarian: None :wink:


(scherpschutter) #132

Do you mean the subs are entirely (so both lines) in the black bar? You don’t see that very often, but it happens if one of the adjustments of the TV - Player isn’t correct. If a player ‘thinks’ it is connected to a 4:3 television, it places the subs in the black bar. If it thinks it is connected to a 16:9 (widescreen) TV, the subs are usually smaller, and in a higher position.


(Lode) #133

Nice hint, I will check this out. And yes: both lines are on the black bar. I will try it…


(retask) #134

Ive been thinking about something. In this film, Gemmas donkey is named Ringo. Is this some kind of italian joke or whats the deal?

This is obviously not a coincident. Does anyone know anything about this?


(Mickey13) #135

[quote=“retask, post:134, topic:158”]Ive been thinking about something. In this film, Gemmas donkey is named Ringo. Is this some kind of italian joke or whats the deal?

This is obviously not a coincident. Does anyone know anything about this?[/quote]
As far as I know, it’s called Sartana not Ringo. It just a coincidence I suppose, as Day Of Anger was made before If You Meet Sartana Pray for Your Death.


(JonathanCorbett) #136

But Mille dollari sul nero/Blood at Sundown was released a year before Day Of Anger:wink:


(Mickey13) #137

You’re right, I forgot about that one…
Nonetheless I think it’s a coincidence… :wink:


(Bill san Antonio) #138

[quote=“Mickey13, post:137, topic:158”]You’re right, I forgot about that one…
Nonetheless I think it’s a coincidence… ;)[/quote]
With name like Sartana, I don’t think so.


(Col. Douglas Mortimer) #139

And isn’t Sartana actually a girl’s name?


(JonathanCorbett) #140

No, nowhere in the world Sartana is a masculine or feminine first name. In theory it could be the name of a town, in fact in Liguria there’s a city named Sarzana and in Brazil, Colombia Portugal and even Romania there are towns named Santana. A research* surprisingly reveals that there is someone ((less than five persons) in the province of Caltanissetta who has that surname! However in all probability the character’s name - created in 1966 - is derived from the Mexican general and politician Antonio López de Santa Anna, the “Napoleon of the West” also known as Santana.