Buffalo Bill, Hero of the Far West / Buffalo Bill, l’eroe del Far West (Mario Costa, 1964)


(Stanton) #21

As far as I know Bruckner had researched release dates and runtimes in Italy.


(Angel Face) #22

[quote=“Silver Wolf, post:19, topic:1544”]What do you mean with “first Italian western”? Italians have been making westerns since silent movie era, though it’s wasn’t untill early 60s that “spaghetti westerns” as a recognized genre came to be. Which of early Italian westerns count as SWs is a matter of personal opinion. Anyway, some Italian westerns that were released before 1963:

Il bandolero stanco (ITA 1953)
d: Fernando Cerchio

La Sceriffa (ITA 1959)
d: Roberto Bianchi Montero

Il terrore dell’ Oklaholma (ITA 1959)
d: Mario Amendola

Due contro tutti / El sheriff terrible (ITA/SPA 1962)
(Terrible Sheriff)
d: Alberto De Martino

There must be much more, these are just the ones I have. Anyway, Buffalo Bill wasn’t the first in any way. However, I believe it was first to get theatrical distribution in US and as such is a small landmark of the genre.[/quote]

Heard of those, but outside of the names, nothing else. I’ve only ever heard there were a dozen or so Italian westerns before FOD came out, and BUFFALO BILL was one of the first examples (and in the US) and based on how profitable the West German western films were, Italian producers began aggressively pursuing more interest in the genre itself.


(Angel Face) #23

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:20, topic:1544”]You’re right (I only noticed the year directly following the title in bold), but it’s also stated that they were ready to film in march '63, but the works were postponed due to incompetence of a Spanish producer

It’s getting complicated, I’ll do some more research tomorrow
Maybe it’s safe that the film was not made nor released in '62 or '63
For the moment '64 as year of production seems the best candidate, '65 the best candidate for year of release

But where did Bruckner get his dates ('63 production, '64 release) from ?

By the way, Silver Wolf is right, westerns, or western-like movies, have been made in Italy since silent movie era, as the first ‘fullblood’ western however, a film from 1941 is often cited, NOZZE DI SANGUE by Goffredo Allessandrini
I’ll do some research in this area too[/quote]

gotcha. :slight_smile:

At least now I know a bit more about this movie than before. :smiley:


(alk0) #24

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:20, topic:1544”]By the way, Silver Wolf is right, westerns, or western-like movies, have been made in Italy since silent movie era, as the first ‘fullblood’ western however, a film from 1941 is often cited, NOZZE DI SANGUE by Goffredo Allessandrini
I’ll do some research in this area too[/quote]
This one is not in the database! Can you find some more info on it, so we may put it there?


(Stanton) #25

It is:

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Buffalo_Bill%2C_l'eroe_del_far_west


(Angel Face) #26

[quote=“Stanton, post:25, topic:1544”]It is:

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Buffalo_Bill%2C_l’eroe_del_far_wes[/quote]

I think he means this one…

NOZZE DI SANGUE


(alk0) #27

[quote=“Stanton, post:25, topic:1544”]It is:

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Buffalo_Bill%2C_l’eroe_del_far_wes[/quote]
But i was speaking about

and it isn’t :wink:


(alk0) #28

[quote=“Angel Face, post:26, topic:1544”]I think he means this one…

NOZZE DI SANGUE[/quote]
Yeah, exactly. We posted it almost at the same time :stuck_out_tongue:


(Stanton) #29

[quote=“Angel Face, post:26, topic:1544”]I think he means this one…

NOZZE DI SANGUE[/quote]

Ah ok, ha ha, myself should first read, then post.

But I have nothing about this film found. Bruckner doesn’t mention it nor its director. The Fatmandan list of all european westerns also doesn’t have it.

There is only a 1942 western by Giorgio Ferroni, another Romeo and Juliet version.


(Tom B.) #30

Here’s a link to a poster and a small story synopsis. I am known to stretch the boundaries of what I call a western but this is no western in any stretch of the imagination.

http://www.mat.uniroma1.it/~procesi/ballester-web/ballester-web-Pages/Image2.html


(Bill san Antonio) #31

Back to the film itself:

I just watched this and it was pretty much what I expected. Very much like american b-westerns: indians, cavalry, little bit of romantic plot and bad guys selling guns and booze to indians.

One of the very few Italian westerns which actually is traditional cowboys vs Indians style film but still not really worth watching unless you’re completist or interested of early films of the genre.


(autephex) #32

Exactly why I’m in no rush to watch this

I’ll take a Fidani over traditional cowboys vs Indians any day of the week


(ENNIOO) #33

Old school Cowboys and Indians lark, with some very posh sounding Indians :smiley: . Fierce battle near the end of the film. Hated the score as very bland. Gordon Scott plays the energetic lead, who I think is pretty good in The Tramplers which I recently re viewed.


(ION BRITTON) #34

Watched this one today. Surely feels more like a b US western, couldn’t spot any strong spaghettish elements no matter how hard I tried. It doesn’t look terribly cheap though, there’s lots of soldiers and indians and the battles/charges are well staged for a film of its kind. The indians especially looked quite real, although they spoke very good english with a very good accent as well haha. It’s not really bad, however I don’t see how it could appeal to the fans of the more hardcore SWs despite the appearance of Piero Lulli and Mario Brega.


(ENNIOO) #35

Yes, the posh accents of the indians in these early ones make me laugh.


(scherpschutter) #36

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/863/vlcsnap2011061220h04m36.png/

[size=12pt]Posh accent, moi? [/size]

[size=12pt]http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Buffalo_Bill,_Hero_of_the_Far_West_Review[/size]


(StefaanD) #37

Great review Scherps, unfortunately i don’t understand Italian that good but it was nice to see Brega in that interview, and still with beard.


(Stanton) #38

2 questions Scherp:

  1. Audie Murphy made Cavalry westerns?

  2. The Tramplers was shot in 1963? It was released in December 65, and I assumed it was also shot in that year?


(scherpschutter) #39

[quote=“Stanton, post:38, topic:1544”]2 questions Scherp:

  1. Audie Murphy made Cavalry westerns?

  2. The Tramplers was shot in 1963? It was released in December 65, and I assumed it was also shot in that year?[/quote]

  3. I thought he did, if I think of him, it’s in cavalry uniform. But I’m not a great fan, so I might be mistaken.

  4. It positively was the first film to be shot in the Elios studios, and it was started up immediately after Band’s first western production, Massacre at Grand Canyon (that still had used a Winnetou village in ex-Yugoslavia)
    But I’ll check things once again. I might have made an error. The info on Elios is a bit hard to get.

@ Stefaan : Don’t worry, I understand only half of what Brega says. I think he’s from Trastevere, and the so-called Trasteverini aren’t easy to understand, not even for Italians. Another Trasteverino is the soccer player Totti. When he became famous, he was sent back to school, to learn Italian because nobody could understand a word of what he said. What Brega speaks here, is a blend of Italian and Roman accent.


(Stanton) #40

I also thought that Nero was in The Tramplers very shortly before he was casted as Django.