What is it about Spaghetti Westerns that appeals to you?


(korano) #1

Forgive me if this topic has been discussed before or has it’s own topic. But I’ve been doing some thinking recently about why I like these films so much. And I’d like to know what is it about spaghettis that has made you a fan of the genre?

Me, I like the complex simplicity of the films. The performances, violence, style, and atmosphere were usually quite flamboyant during the Spaghettis heyday. I like all of these factors. But recently, I’ve taken more notice of the symoblism and imagery of the genre. Right now I’m watching Sentenza di Morte. The episode with the black shirted henchmen is a great example of why I like the genre. It is obviously unrealistic and inaccurate to the time period. But still says something about Italy. But the liberties these types of aspects take are great and make for great cinema. After all, if you wanted to see real life, just watch the news (or maybe a John Cassavetes movie). So, the over the top liberties they take with the western is a wonderful relief from much more renowned and serious films. Their just easy to sit back and watch.


(ekimklaw) #2

The action, the music, the cheesy voices (dubbed), the ricocheting bullet sound, the Mexican flair, did I mention action… also… there’s LOTS of them!

Think I’ll go watch one right now! ;D


(ENNIOO) #3

Hope you watch a good one :wink: .


(natos99) #4

Grit, pain, revenge, awesome gun fights, beautiful cinematography & the odd one liner…

Experimentation is great too which I think alot of people did with the spaghetti westerns which is also whats makes them so unique & different ;D


(MetalGeorge) #5

The style, the music, the raw emotional depth. I’m the sort of person who becomes REALLY attached and involved in a film, and I always find myself drawn to so many of the SW’s universal themes of revenge, violence and justice. It probably helps that the titles kick so much ass, and there are so many huge, epic mythological heroes, from Sartana and Sabata to Django and The Man With No Name.

Of course, any SW with a Morricone score is BOUND to up the emotional ante/factor, as well! :smiley:


(sartana1968) #6

iam crazy for the sound of guns!!


(jesse james) #7

the sound of guns can be heard in many other kinds of movies as well. Why are you not so crazy about them?


(jesse james) #8

[quote=“MetalGeorge, post:5, topic:2477”]The style, the music, the raw emotional depth. I’m the sort of person who becomes REALLY attached and involved in a film, and I always find myself drawn to so many of the SW’s universal themes of revenge, violence and justice. It probably helps that the titles kick so much ass, and there are so many huge, epic mythological heroes, from Sartana and Sabata to Django and The Man With No Name.

Of course, any SW with a Morricone score is BOUND to up the emotional ante/factor, as well! :D[/quote]
That’s quite how I feel too. And I become particularly attached to the heroes. I think what mainly attracts us is that we would like to be like them. The themes and the symbolisms of sw are one of the most important points about these films. The political messages they send have the same depth at any time.


(MetalGeorge) #9

Definitely. There’s a reason why I was so crushed at the end of The Great Silence; because I REALLY wanted Silence to come out on top, against all odds, even though-realistically-there was no shot, and no hope.

Combined with the evocative music, I just can’t help but become emotionally invested! I’m that way with most movies in general, however, regardless of genre. I can get WAY into a good story.


(Stanton) #10

Well, Django made it, why not Silence also?


(jesse james) #11

Because the final massacre is based on actual facts. And the whole story was constructed in such a way that no other conclusion was possible. And it was a pity indeed.


(Stanton) #12

Is it really based on actual facts? I doubt it, despite what it says at the end.

And besides it’s not a realistic movie in the end.


(korano) #13

Based on actual facts in the same way as Fargo is maybe?


(sartana1) #14

With a few exceptions I’m not a fan of American westerns at all…I’ve never watched a John Wayne movie. To me SWs have interesting characters, more bounty hunters & gamblers and less cowboys & indians, more action and incredible soundtracks.


(Stanton) #15

Explain, please


(John Welles) #16

I’m very dubious that the epilogue is anything remotely resembling the truth. The way I see it, it’s a way of having a semi-happy ending, saying that the bounty hunters are all disbanded. I imagine it was added by some nervous producer.


(I love you M.E. Kay) #17

I never considered that a “happy ending”, I’m pretty sure that if such a massacre ever took place, even during that time, special measures would have been taken so it wouldn’t happen again. Just seems like a realistic touch to me.


(korano) #18

[quote=“Stanton, post:15, topic:2477”]Explain, please[/quote]Fargo begins with the “Based on a True Story” thing but isn’t based on anything except a script. Just used to spice up the story.

Though in Silence, it doesn’t say true story at all. All it does is summarize the repercussions of the ending in the world of the film.


(Stanton) #19

Ahh, thanks, I didn’t remember that.


(jesse james) #20

the differences between sws and american ones are much deeper