What book are you reading tonight?


(Asa) #601

My paperback copy of Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy arrived today. I read it on my Kindle ages ago, thought it was superb, and meant to purchase a proper copy of it ever since. Finally got round to it, now I’ll no doubt get stuck into it again.


(scherpschutter) #602

[quote=“last.caress, post:601, topic:1204”]My paperback copy of Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy arrived today. I read it on my Kindle ages ago, thought it was superb, and meant to purchase a proper copy of it ever since. Finally got round to it, now I’ll no doubt get stuck into it again.

[/quote]

Read it a couple of years ago, I was not as impressed as I thought I would be. Oddly enough I prefer (and was deeply impressed by) some of his other novels


(Asa) #603

I’ve got a bunch of his novels on my Kindle in addition to this one - All the Pretty Horses, Cities of the Plain, The Crossing, No Country For Old Men and The Road - but I’ve never looked at any of them, which is really a bit silly given how much I enjoyed Blood Meridian. I really need to have a look at them but, alas, I’m not as much of a reader as I have been previously. Perhaps I should place “Books!” on the New Year’s Resolution list.


(Bill san Antonio) #604

Not reading but but I listened Greg Sestero’s audio book of Disaster Artist about Tommy Wiseau and making of The Room. This stuff is so bonkers that it’s hard to believe it’s all true. I need to see the film adaptation.


#605

Before reading your post, I had never even heard of that film, let alone the mythology surrounding it. You’ve made me curious … and the omniscient Wikipedia has a lot to say about The Room and its director.


Ghost Town (1998) isn’t Robert Coover’s best work but still funny and witty enough to keep you entertained throughout. The reason why I’m mentioning it here is that one of the book’s stereotypical characters, a hapless old prospector, unintentionally comes up with an almost perfect definition of the Spaghetti Western filone (first Grove Press edition, pp. 55–56):

“So it aint about gold at all nor land neither nor freedom—hoo! freedom, shit!—nor civvylizin the wilderness and smoothin the heathen encrustations from the savage mind, oh no, hell no! It’s about, lissen t’me now, it’s about style. They aint nuthin else to it. Cept fer the killin, a course, caint even have style without the killin, but thet’s easy, aint nobody caint kill, it’s like eatin and fartin. But dustin em with class, with a bitta spiff’n yer own wrinkle, thet’s one in a million billion.”


#606

Currently,Name of the Game by Charles Kelly whenever I have more than a few free seconds.

However, :nerd_face: I will take this opportunity to post this list I made in 2012 when I was trying to understand storytelling better. The numbers are the number of times I read the book. I not only read hardcover book Story 10 times(broke the binding in multiple places) but listened to the book on tape at least that many times. I only read Hero with 1000 faces 2x but listened to the audio version about 10x as well.

10 Story McKee
3 Anatomy of Story Truby

1 Adventures in Screentrade Goldman
2 Hero With 1000 Faces Campbell
3 Between the Lines Page
1 Screenplay Field
1 Characters, Emotion, Viewpoint Kress
1 Creative Filmmaking From the Inside Out Dannenbaum
1 Aristotle’s Poetics for Screenwriters Tierno

1 The Writer’s Journey Vogler
1 The Screenwriter’s Bible Trottier
1 The Art of Dramatic Writing Egri
1 Writing Screenplays That Sell Hauge
1 Making Movies Lumet
1 Creating Unforgettable Characters Seger
1 Setting Up Your Shots Vineyard
1 Setting Up Your Scenes Pepperman
1 The Hollywood Standard Riley
1 Screenwriting 101 Hicks

1 Myth and the Movies Voytilla
1 Masters of the American Cinema Giannetti up to page 108
4 Horror Movies Hutchings
4 Stealing Fire From The Gods Bonnet

1 Cinematic Storytelling Van Stilj
1 Understanding Movies Giannetti
1 The Conversations Walter Murch interviews
2 Film Noir Spicer
1 In the Blink of an Eye Murch

1 Save the cat blake snyder