What Are Your Top Ten Favourite Novels?


(John Welles) #1

Mine are:

  1. “The Hobbit” by J. R. R. Tolkien
  2. “The Big Sleep” by Raymond Chandler
  3. “The Long Goodbye” by Raymond Chandler
  4. “The Maltese Falcon” by Dashiel Hammett
  5. “Brighton Rock” by Graham Greene
  6. “The Great Gatsby” F. Scott Fitzgerald
  7. "“Moby Dick” by Herman Melville
  8. “The Hound of the Baskervilles” by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  9. “Greenmantle” by Lord John Buchan
  10. "The Code of the Woosters "by Sir P. G. Wodehouse

(Frank Talby) #2

here are mine…

  1. “1984” by George Orwell
  2. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
  3. “Dracula” by Bram Stoker
  4. “Hellbound Heart” by Clive Barker
  5. “Case of Charles Dexter Ward” by H.P. Lovcecraft
  6. “Christine” by Stephen King
  7. “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
  8. “Party Games” by Hans Helmut Kirst
  9. “The Martian Chronicles” by Ray Bradbury
  10. “Deception Point” by Dan Brown

(Dillinger) #3

Ah, literature! Good thread…

My top10:

  1. “Holzfällen” by Thomas Bernhard
  2. “Slaughterhouse Five” by Kurt Vonnegut
  3. “Der Proceß” (The Trial) by Franz Kafka
  4. “Cold Skin” by Albert Sánchez Piñol
  5. “Am Hang” by Markus Werner
  6. “The Crying of Lot 49” by Thomas Pynchon
  7. “Der Gehülfe” (The Assistant) by Robert Walser
  8. “Zeno’s Conscience” by Italo Suevo
  9. “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams
  10. “The Master and Margarita” by Mikhail Bulgakov

(Starblack) #4

Damn, making these lists is difficult. I’ve never actually ranked my favourite novels before, so this was an interesting exercise. I’d prefer to think of this as a representative sampling rather than a straight 1-10, and I’ve kept it to one title per author. Moreover, they’re in chronological order (although Hearts of Darkness, concidentally the oldest, is also my favourite).

  1. Heart of Darkness/Conrad
  2. The Trial/Kafka
  3. Brave New World/Huxley
  4. The Big Sleep/Chandler
  5. Catch 22/Heller
  6. One Hundred Years of Solitude/Garcia Marquez
  7. Red Dragon/Harris
  8. Blood Meridian/McCarthy
  9. The Storyteller/Vargas Llosa
  10. American Tabloid/Ellroy

(John Welles) #5

I can’t understand how I foregot the Si-Fi classics…

“Foundation” by Issac Asimov
"The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams
"Rogue Ship" by A. V. Van Vogt


(Paco Roman) #6

Some very good lists here :slight_smile:

1984 is one of my favourites too.
I like Ray Bradbury very much. Fahrenheit 451 and the Martian Chronicales are fairly good books. I like his clever short stories too.
My favourite novel by Franz Kafka is Das Schloss - THE CASTLE.
Another great author is Leo Perutz with his Novel The Master of the Day of Judgement.
The Stranger and The Plague by Albert Camus.
H.P. Lovecrafts The Mountain of Madness and The Shadow over Innsmouth.
Kill Shot by Elmore Leonard
Baudolino by Umberto Eco (and I liked of course The Name of the Rose= Great Book and great Movie!).
The Damnation Game and Coldheart Canyon by Clive Barker
Atlantis, The Stand and Misery by Stephen King.
:slight_smile:


(John Welles) #7

If I can have short story collections, I would include “Over to You” by Roald Dahl (befroe he wrote children’s novels), which is a collection of short storys about World War 2. In my opinion, it is quite possibly the greatest book I have ever read.


(John Welles) #8

Here’s my top thirty favourite novels of all time…

  1. “Titus Groan” by Mervyn Peake
  2. “Foundation” by Isaac Asimov
  3. “The Hobbit” by J. R. R. Tolkien
  4. “The Big Sleep” by Raymond Chandler
  5. “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
  6. “The Day of the Triffids” by John Wyndham
  7. “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville
  8. “The Long Goodbye” by Raymond Chandler
  9. “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  10. “Brighton Rock” by Graham Greene
  11. “The Maltese Falcon” by Dashiell Hammett
  12. “This Side of Paradise” by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  13. “The Mask of Dimitrios” by Eric Amberler
  14. “The Thin Man” by Dashiell Hammett
  15. “Travels with My Aunt” by Graham Greene
  16. “The War of the Worlds” by H. G. Wells
  17. “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens
  18. “Red Harvest” by Dashiell Hammett
  19. “The Code of the Woosters” by P. G. Wodehouse
  20. “Watership Down” by Richard Adams
  21. “The Bridge on the River Kwai” by Pierre Boulle
  22. “Greenmantle” by John Buchan
  23. “The Sands of Mars” by Arthur C. Clark
  24. “The Glass Key” by Dashiell Hammett
  25. “The Three Hostages” by John Buchan
  26. “Biggles: The Cruise of the Condor” by Captain W. E. Johns
  27. “The Dain Curse” by Dashiell Hammett
  28. “The Plague Dogs” by Richard Adams
  29. “The Great Escape” by Paul Brickhill
  30. “The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams

(scherpschutter) #9

In no particular order:
(Titels in bold are special favourites)

Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights
Charles Dickens: Bleak House
Lev Tolstoj: War and peace
Nicolaj Gogol: Dead Souls
Fjodor Dostojevski: Crime and Punishment
George Eliot: The mill on the Floss
Kawabata Yasunari: Snowland
Mishima Yukio: Mourning for the Fatherland
Theodor Fontane: Irrungen, Wirrungen
Thomas Mann: Der Zauberberg
Henryk Sienkiewicz: Quo Vadis
Philip Roth: Portnoy’s Complaint
Patricia Highsmith: Deep Water
Katherine Mansfield: Collected short stories
Italo Svevo: La coscienza di Zeno
Stephen King: The Body
Raymond Chandler: The Long Goodbye
RossMacDonald: The Big Chill
Michel Houellebecq: les particules Elémentaires
Vladimir Nabokov: Pninn
James Joyce: Dubliners
Dylan Thomas: Prospect of the sea & other stories
Hjalmar Söderberg: Doctor Glass
John Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath
Tauo Tsu Chin: The dream in the Red Chamber
Kate Chopin: Short Stories
Carson McCullers: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Marcel Proust: A la recherche du temps perdu
Anton Tsjechov: The three Sisters
Richard Adams: Watership Down
Lewis Carrol: Alice in Wonderland & Alice through the Looking Glass
Gerard Reve: De Avonden (The Evenings)
Willem Elsschot: Kaas (Cheese)
Bordewijk: Bint
Maarten 't Hart: De Jacobsladder


(John Welles) #10

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:9, topic:1901”]In no particular order:
(Titels in bold are special favourites)

Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights
Charles Dickens: Bleak House
Lev Tolstoj: War and peace
Nicolaj Gogol: Dead Souls
Fjodor Dostojevski: Crime and Punishment
George Eliot: The mill on the Floss
Kawabata Yasunari: Snowland
Mishima Yukio: Mourning for the Fatherland
Theodor Fontane: Irrungen, Wirrungen
Thomas Mann: Der Zauberberg
Henryk Sienkiewicz: Quo Vadis
Philip Roth: Portnoy’s Complaint
Patricia Highsmith: Deep Water
Katherine Mansfield: Collected short stories
Italo Svevo: La coscienza di Zeno
Stephen King: The Body
Raymond Chandler: The Long Goodbye
RossMacDonald: The Big Chill
Michel Houellebecq: les particules Elémentaires
Vladimir Nabokov: Pninn
James Joyce: Dubliners
Dylan Thomas: Prospect of the sea & other stories
Hjalmar Söderberg: Doctor Glass
John Steinbeck: The Grapes of Wrath
Tauo Tsu Chin: The dream in the Red Chamber
Kate Chopin: Short Stories
Carson McCullers: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Marcel Proust: A la recherche du temps perdu
Anton Tsjechov: The three Sisters
Richard Adams: Watership Down
Lewis Carrol: Alice in Wonderland & Alice through the Looking Glass
Gerard Reve: De Avonden (The Evenings)
Willem Elsschot: Kaas (Cheese)
Bordewijk: Bint
Maarten 't Hart: De Jacobsladder[/quote]
Some great (if heavy) books there!


(scherpschutter) #11

With the exception of Proust (thousands of pages, no narratave in the classic sense) and that classic Chinese novel, none of these novels can be called really ‘heavy’. Crime and punishment is complex from a philisophical point of view, but it can be read as a thriller too, and most peoplewho have read it, call it very suspenseful.

Tolstoj, Dickens, Eliot, Sienkiewicz: those novels are long, but not difficult to read.


(Phil H) #12

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:9, topic:1901”]In no particular order:
(Titels in bold are special favourites)

Philip Roth: Portnoy’s Complaint[/quote]

I haven’t read any Roth for some years but I did read a lot of his stuff some years ago. Portnoy’s Complaint was actually one I never really enjoyed. My favourite of his was The Great American Novel. Very funny and would appeal to all our baseball fans.


(John Welles) #13

[quote=“scherpschutter, post:11, topic:1901”]With the exception of Proust (thousands of pages, no narratave in the classic sense) and that classic Chinese novel, none of these novels can be called really ‘heavy’. Crime and punishment is complex from a philisophical point of view, but it can be read as a thriller too, and most peoplewho have read it, call it very suspenseful.

Tolstoj, Dickens, Eliot, Sienkiewicz: those novels are long, but not difficult to read.[/quote]
When I said “heavy”, I ment books that deal with large, important themes.


(klinteastwood) #14

not a top ten but whatever

The Dark Tower series is awesome

and anything by Cormac McCarthy is golden

especially Blood Meridian


(John Welles) #15

Who’s that written by?


(Frank Talby) #16

Stephen King


(John Welles) #17

Is he in his horror mode or not?


(klinteastwood) #18

The Dark Tower series is like part western, part fantasy, part horror…the way I like to sum it up is by saying its basically as if The Man With No Name from the Dollars Trilogy was in a Lord of the Rings-type world and setting…although its a bit more complicated than that…you should check it out


(John Welles) #19

That sounds very interesting… especially the Man With No-Name bit!