TeDeum


(CactusCharlie) #1

Personally i think it sucks, i feel that this type of slapstick comedy was best suited to the 1930’s/40’s.

A lot of great talent is wasted here, Jack Palance, Lionel Stander & Giancarlo Prete are the most wasted talent.

It makes a mockery of SW’s and does not hold a candle to Nobody & the Trinity movies.

Your thoughts on this please.


(ENNIOO) #2

The only thing I recall about this one is the pop like score at times by G & M De Angelis.


(Bluntwolf) #3

[quote=“CactusCharlie, post:1, topic:981”]Personally i think it sucks, i feel that this type of slapstick comedy was best suited to the 1930’s/40’s.

A lot of great talent is wasted here, Jack Palance, Lionel Stander & Giancarlo Prete are the most wasted talent.

It makes a mockery of SW’s[/quote]

All very true !!! This extremly cheesy piece of SW material is just a disgrace to the genre ! I prefer a Fidani or even Crea to Enzo G. Castellari’s worst movie (Cipolla Colt is another example) !


(Bluntwolf) #4

Here’s the poster to that crappy movie !!!

[attachment older than 600 days, deleted by admin]


(alk0) #5

I think it perfectly shows what was wrong with those comedy-spaghettis of the 70s. They were silly alright, but that’s not the problem, because the silly comedies can be funny too. The main problem was that they were simply boring. I admit i laughed a little bit once or twice but apart from that it wasn’t funny at all. Palance was ok in this one, but Strander [as well as rest of Tedeum’s family] was simply irritating. And it was painful to watch when they were making an idiot of Fajardo for most of the time, it’s a simple waste of one of the best villains of the genre. The terrible finale in the bathhouse has to be seen to be believed. I disliked the music. 2/10


(Romaine Fielding) #6

What is the meaning of the title (TeDeum)?

It has a homonym in English: tedium. Which means, of course, boredom. While that sounds appropriate, I can’t imagine that’s what TeDeum means.


(Bad Lieutenant) #7

I think it’s Latin for ‘we praise you, god’ or something like that. It’s in a Catholic hymn, so tedium is not far off.


(Bluntwolf) #8

Tedeum is the name of the main character. Don’t know if there’s any meaning to it !? ???


(alk0) #9

Anyway, why the voting is closed?


(Romaine Fielding) #10

Heheee. Good one

Thanks


(Stanton) #11

After having ruined I Came I Saw I Shot with the senseless adding of comedy elements, Tedeum was Castellari’s first pure western comedy. After having rewatched this one (or maybe it was Cry Onion) in TV Castellari had claimed that he was ashamed for having made it.

But it ain’t that bad. Castellari is not a too great talent for comedies, and like many other comedy westerns it’s often more silly than funny. Sometimes the forced silliness is a funny one, sometimes it’s only a silly silliness.

At least I got a few laughs out of it. Some scenes had a certain charme while the reputed climaxes (the fistifights) didn’t worked that well. Interestingly while Castellari had too much fistfights in his “serious” westerns, there are not so much in this comedy, which was made in the heydays of ruling fistfights.

For western fans only recommended to the serious trainspotter.


(scherpschutter) #12

[quote=“Romaine Fielding, post:6, topic:981”]What is the meaning of the title (TeDeum)?

It has a homonym in English: tedium. Which means, of course, boredom. While that sounds appropriate, I can’t imagine that’s what TeDeum means.[/quote]

TeDeum is short for Te Deum Laudamus, literally ‘You God we praise’

So, no, there’s no real connection to tedium, although I must say it was a good try


(p.pereira) #13

“Te Deum” in Portuguese, “tu Deus”.Similar, hein?!
But the catholic people says “vós Deus”


(scherpschutter) #14

[quote=“p.pereira, post:13, topic:981”]“Te Deum” in Portuguese, “tu Deus”.Similar, hein?!
But the catholic people says “vós Deus”[/quote]

Vós is probably like the French Vous (Italian voi), a polite form of address

I don’t know how things are in Portuguese, but in French this polite form ‘Vous’ is still very popular and used daily; in Italian it has become obsolete after WWII (they now use, as polite form, the third person Lei instead). On Italian soundtracks of spaghetti westerns you still often hear this ‘voi’ form (they’re set before WWII !)


(p.pereira) #15

Exactly! It’s the same word. Nowadays it is not very popular, it is used almost only by elders, or in some polite phrases. Nevertheless in some Portugal regions (north interior) it is still used.


(Stanton) #16

Tedeum was born while his mother was in church at the moment the Te deum laudamus was spoken.

Sooo …

Die deutsche Synchronisation kippt übrgens noch ein paar Schippen Albernheit obendrauf.

Meine Lieblingsstellen aus der Abteilung “Meisterwerke der deutschen Blödelsyncro”:

  1. "Gib sie wieder her"
    Gesungen von Tedeum als er eine gestohlene Uhr von seinem Bruder verlangt. Gesungen ist es natürlich ein Zitat eines bekannten deutschen Kinderliedes.

  2. "Mönchsgewand - noch nicht erkannt"
    Als eine Gruppe Sheriffs rätselt woher sie den Mönch (J. Palance) kennen (der ja tatsächlich ein falscher ist), wendet sich plötzlich einer um und sagt diesen genial dämlichen Satz, worauf alle im Raum in ein genauso köstliches wie sinnfreies Lachen ausbrechen.

Beide Szenen muß man aber gesehen haben, oder eher gehört haben.


(ION BRITTON) #17

Shame on everyone involved in this piece of shit. 0/5


(Bill san Antonio) #18

the poll is just great in this topic.


(chuck connors brother) #19

I’d give this 2 for Jack Palance, looked like he had a good time making this. It wasn’t much fun to sit through at times… still nowhere near as painful as I Came I Saw I Shot for me (too many stupid fist fights).


(ENNIOO) #20

Palance really seems to be enjoying the beans in this one.