Spaghetti Westerns that "try something different"


(korano) #1

Though Spaghetti Westerns aren’t necessarily an assembly line of similarity, there are films that go beyond tongue in cheek and go for something different. Maybe not even relating to tongue in cheekness.

What I’m trying to get at here are what are you thoughts on films that have a completely different film making style for a Spaghetti? Films like…

In the Name of the Father, the Son, and the Colt - Giallo
Blue Gang - Revisionist Western
Tequila - Dark Comedy(?)
Starblack - Old Serial
Pecos Cleans Up - Treasure Hunt
Hills Run Red - Anthony Mann
Beyond the Law - American Western
Matalo - Surrealist
Cut Throats Nine - Gore/Exploitation
Django Kill - Horror

Any thought?


(Starblack) #2

They needed to diversify, to incorporate and exploit new cultural and film-making trends; if they hadn’t, I think Italian audiences, for example, would have grown tired of them much earlier than they did.

This tendency was endemic in the best SWs from the beginning - A Fistful of Dollars spliced Dashiell Hammett with Akira Kurosawa, GBU adopted a picaresque tone, Return of Ringo Greek Tragedy, ad nauseam.

It didn’t always work of course, but that’s beside the point.

In other words, as far as the finest examples are concerned, “trying something different” wasn’t the exception, it was the rule.


(Silence) #3

Fury of Johnny Kid and Johnny Hamlet are Shakespeare based movies and China 9, Liberty 37 is a, hmm, Drama?


(korano) #4

Romance maybe. But drama is a bit too broad I think. A classic type drama would be Forgotten Pistolero. Greek melodrama.


(ENNIOO) #5

Different ideas means the potential of more cash perhaps.


(Silence) #6

Agree.


(ION BRITTON) #7

And God Said To Cain - Horror/SW mixture
Get mean / The Silent Stranger / Fighting Fists of Shangai Joe - For the obvious reasons

Maybe El Puro too. Here’s something from the Robert Woods and Marc Fiorini on El Puro article

With Fiorini and Woods on the same page as to the direction they saw the film going the pair collaborated on a rewrite of the script which blended a ‘life and death of a gunfighter’ narrative [b]with a Buddhist theme[/b]

Not sure if they entirely succeeded, but there’s surely something different especially towards the end of the film.

EDIT: The Price Of Death - A rather succesfull whodunnit/spaghetti mixture