Ringo and His Golden Pistol / Johnny Oro (Sergio Corbucci, 1966)


(Stanton) #41

Another interesting point is that the hero (not anti-hero :wink: ) looks with his black clothes and his small moustache like the film’s baddie, while the sadistic baddie has the soft and sympathetic looks of mother’s dream of the perfect fiancee for her beloved daughter.

But that and some nasty violence and the strong opening scene, that’s all the film has to offer.


(Novecento) #42

Interesting…

Also interesting

Although, in some ways it feels more like a Corbucci film than “Hellbenders” which others have noted to often show the hand of the producer Albert Band. Corbucci might have lost interest in this one and left others to finish some things up for him, but at least it doesn’t feel like someone else was behind the overall conception (in spite of it being at an early stage in his career).


(Stanton) #43

Yes, the Corbucci feeling is there, only in a rather primitive basic version. Corbucci was developing his style and his ideas, and it is easy to understand why he had more interest in doing Django.

Hellbenders has like Johnny Oro some of the yet unfinished early Corbucci style, but it is put on a stuff not suitable for that style. Like Navajo Joe it would have been more logical if I Crudeli had been made before Django, but then, there was never much logic behind Corbucci’s output.


(Novecento) #44

[quote=“stanton, post:43, topic:1130, full:true”]Like Navajo Joe it would have been more logical if I Crudeli had been made before Django, but then, there was never much logic behind Corbucci’s output.
[/quote]

Yes, Django followed by the Great Silence would have made more sense.


(scherpschutter) #45

Alex Cox once said that he had the idea that Leone was more fond of preparing a production, so planning it, than of filming it. I don’t know if that is true, but if so, Corbucci was his direct opposite: he was a very impulsive man, accepted a job and would even walk away from one set if another project looked more promising. He lived from set tot set, so to speak, and felt happy in-between. Instead of polishing a script beforehand, he preferred to write it, scene for scene if necessary, on the set. No wonder that there’s hardly any logic or consistency behind his choices or output


(Novecento) #46

That’s a very interesting point. Leone certainly acted as a creative producer in the classical Hollywood style (as I pointed out in my Cinema Retro article on My Name is Nobody). Given how close they were as friends, it’s interesting how they differed in that sense.