Revenge of Trinity / La cólera del viento (Mario Camus, 1970)

Not viewed the film yet. Had a quick flick through though. Average dubbing with lots of familar voices of people who were dubbing around this time.

Brooding Hill here, and often looking in very deep thought. Such a contrast to say his Trinity character. Bit slow at first but soon got involved in this one. Predictable story, but then again I did read the back of dvd cover a few times. Not a very happy sort of film, but thought alot of the score tracks ( which I liked ) were fairly upbeat happy ones. Unusual contrast I thought.

Away from home for a couple of weeks and not beeing (well no more at least) a party animal like the people here (it seems I’m the only one who believes that the next day is a working day), so its a good time for watching some films in my free time.
This was one I brought and was curious to watch it, since it got a review here in the forum. I’ve already watch it a long time ago when this political with left wing messages films were quite popular in the country.
Not a bad film, but not a masterpiece by far, not even Camus best film, he would made better ones in the future La colmena a good exemple. The strange thing is that apart from the winschester (a big mistake in production terms, these weapons were very rare in any country of Europe, mostly cause they were expensive and there were no spares and stuff like that only collectors and use them, german mausers would be more normal), the film didn’t look like a Western spag or not to me, felt more like those Italian political dramas Bertolucci and others kind of work, maybe the film in its genesis was even more Spanish and so impossible to made. The political message of the film is quite obvious and too direct, and I still find it hard to believe it was shown in Spain in the time it was released, the director kept the film interesting to follow, but without any genial toutch, by the contrary all pretty trivial in narrative terms and romantic scenes were very badly done, and our main character as a change of heart so sudden that it makes it hard for us to believe in it.
Having someone like Hill is quite a surprise, but I must stay that this one is one of his best performances in non spaghettis (and for me its not a spag) and also one of the best before the Trinita films, only in the most dramatic parts we strugled a bit more, in any case this was something more suited for a Franco Nero, but still Hill is very believeble as a hired killer. Bucella was a lovely actress. Camus got a lot of directing credits some before this film but this was clearly a project that he didn’t control 100%.
Still a good film to watch, and not only for Terence Hill fans, the major flaw is that the more Spanish approach is missing here.

I found this review I wrote some time ago from my computer. For some reason I never posted it here though. Until now:

Terence Hill plays Marco, silent killer hired by rich land owners to assassinate political agitators who are leading the strikers among poor peons. But Marco falls in love with the local girl and soon turns against the oppressors.

Like mentioned in the in film’s database page this is not a real western but it’s set in 1800’s Spain. But at least in the english language print i saw the place of the locations are never mentioned and the look and the theme of the film are very similar as in some Zapata westerns. Film was also marketed as a western probably partly because it was shot in Franco’s Spain where such a political film as this would have been banned but westerns were seen as a light entertainment. Another problem with the genre definition came with the re-title. Film was made just before Trinity success so this serious and moody film was inevitably re-titled to Revenge of Trinity. Even the Scandinavian dvd release has a cover art with smiling Terence Hill as if the film would be regular Hill & Spencer comedy.

Film is pretty slow-moving and moody accompanied with sad guitar music and whistling. Maybe too slow at times and even if you regard it as a western or not it really lacks some action during the middle part to balance the heavy-handed political content.
Film has a good cast with beautiful Maria Grazia Buccella having strong female lead, Mario Pardo as Marco’s brother and the always great Fernando Rey as a vile Don Antonio. Terence Hill is impressive as a cold killer with only minimum lines of dialogue.

Film is worth watching especially if you’re into more thoughtful films and Zapata westerns or if you like like Hill in his early non-comedic roles.

Isn’t the film set in the 1900’s? I would assume around 1910 or 1920.

It was released only a few days before They Call Me Trinity. Both in Dez 1970.

Seems more accurate. At the end of this period Spanish employers started to hire professional pistoleros to kill off TU activists, like in the film. I have recently rewatched two different versions of this one. But I haven’t seen an uncut version. It seems from the film’s DVD page there are two German uncut versions with a Spanish audio. I guess the 2015 release is the better?

It seems both DVDs present identical versions of the film. I watched the older release, titled Der Teufel kennt kein Halleluja, some years ago and thought the audio and video quality was okay, far from excellent. Interestingly, La collera del vento was released in Italy the same month as Barboni’s first Trinità-movie, December 1970, and Italian cinema audiences made it very clear which Hill persona they wished to see. La cólera del viento’s epigraph, attributed to “William Shakespeare” in the film’s German edit, to “W. S.” in the Spanish original, can in fact be traced to Venezuelan left-wing intellectual Humberto Cuenca: “… un cielo tan sucio no se aclara sin una tempestad.”

Should’ve read your post before replying to morgan, sorry.

Something like “a sky so foul will not clear without a tempest”?

I like the other one better.

I ended up with the Edel release from 2015, Trinity schlägt zurück, with a Spanish audio. The picture quality is not all that good, but it is uncut, unlike the Italian release, which is severely cut, but has kept the ending, unlike the Grindhause Experience release, which however has an English audio and even Sweedish subs! Should really like an uncut Italian (or Spanish) version with English subs and first class picture quality of this one. This Forum has polls and list of every kind, why not a wish list? It might even make an impression on someone.

I guess the Marxist reference/implication was obvious to most viewers when the film was released in 1970: “[The communist] revolution is necessary […] not only because the ruling class cannot be overthrown in any other way, but also because the class overthrowing it can only in a revolution succeed in ridding itself of all the muck of ages and become fitted to found society anew” (marxists.org, my emphasis; German text: mlwerke.de).

Well, not everybody had read The German Ideology. Me, I read it in in English in 1966 and in German in 1967…:sunglasses: Great reading! The website marxists.org has by the way done a great job reshuffling it… No communist revolution going on in this film, though, more of an anarcho-syndicalist surrection.

In his detailed discussion of La cólera del viento in Any Gun Can Play, Kevin Grant indicates that Mario Camus’s “[c]o-writer Miguel Rubio attributes the anarchist angle to Camus, with Rubio himself the source of the film’s socialist perspective” (p. 227), citing as source Iván Tubau’s book Crítica cinematográfica española. Bazin contra Aristarco: la gran controversia de los años 60. For scherpschutter, the film’s “[rather simplistic] political message is […] more Bakunin and Proudhon than Marx.”

Interesting. I think sherpschutter hits the target. Being an old trade unionist, I particularly like this film. In my days we used peaceful means, though, more or less.