Return of Sabata / È tornato Sabata … hai chiuso un’altra volta! (Gianfranco Parolini, 1971)

Haha, I´ve watched this film a couple of times. Always when very inebriated. The opening is great, but then I lost it. And perhaps not only because of the excessive consumption of both alcohol and weed.

I just realized my last three posts where about this film, he!

What do you mean? I honestly think the movie needs a little reappraisal, to me it’s hard to believe the first Sabata was once in the top 20, yet Return gets so much flack (not that it’s a great film or anything).

I wonder if the Sabata(s) are not more annoying inebriated, I don’t think I’d be able to stand Ignazio Spalla when drunk! What did you think of the other two?

So true …

[quote=“I love you M.E. Kay, post:90, topic:98”]I just realized my last three posts where about this film, he!

What do you mean? I honestly think the movie needs a little reappraisal, to me it’s hard to believe the first Sabata was once in the top 20, yet Return gets so much flack (not that it’s a great film or anything).

I wonder if the Sabata(s) are not more annoying inebriated, I don’t think I’d be able to stand Ignazio Spalla when drunk! What did you think of the other two?[/quote]
for me it’s hard to believe that 'django kill if you live shoot ’ it’s in the top 20 stupid movie and stupid title as well
sabata deserve to be in

I was joking a bit. But I honestly think that’s what this movie needs: a little reappraisal, not too much

I don’t think the first Sabata is by any means Top 20 work, but it’s a gentle relax movie, this one has its moments, but that’s it

Sabata is in my personal top 10, while Sabata Returns is somewhere in my bottom top 20. I don’t know, it just didn’t work for me, even the opening. Maybe because of the incoherant script, or LVC’s toupee, or the fact that Sabata acts so different in this film.

Yeah the wig is a bit of a shock lol - haven’t seen much of LVC’s 70s movies so that rug was a bit of a surprise

(Although knowing how many gadgets Sabata has, I like to think that he may have kept another derringer under it) ;D

The wig seems that big he may have been able to keep two derringers under it :smiley: .

;D

This is the first spaghetti western I ever really watched. I had seen snippets of the the Leone ones but none from beginning to end. This one, aged about thirteen, I saw straight through. It was so damned odd that I’ve had a soft spot for the movie ever since and couldn’t help watching when it was on the TV last week.

I still think it is odd and it’s not great but it is very well made, which is something you can’t say about a lot of spaghetti westerns. Granted he relys on a few personal tropes such as acrobats and er… one plot but I think Parolini is one of the best SW directors. He approaches the level of the three Sergios for me. This movie looks so good and has such interesting camera angles and shots. Granted it’s all in the service of a spoofy, nothing plot but it still has original elements like the circus, the gold forgery and the Irish villian. Van Cleef just grins his way through it it but he is very watchable, and I’ve never understood the criticsm of Reiner Schone. Sure he is no William Berger but he is perfect in the role!

Maybe it’s dumb but it is also one of the most professionally mounted lookings SWs ever produced!

Regularly credited Dante Cona (black and white pic) and Carmelo Reale are kind of hard to find in this one…

Contrary to what reported on IMDb there is no Mario Brega cameo, unless he appears in the background for ten frames or so. I have not noticed Funari and Severini, listed among uncredited actors.

The horny boy is played by Gérard Boucaron and not by sex comedies actor Stefano Amato. Maybe this character is called Higgins in the English dub?

The circus gunfighter with a gray front tooth is not Mimmo Maggio: this guy also appears in Wanted Sabata (in which he plays a character called Pedro Sanchez!), Kill the Poker Player and Durango Is Coming Pay or Die, in which is part of Manuel Bienvenido’s gang…

Blond Irishman was a misleading description for Vittorio Fanfoni, I changed it in bearded Irishman.

It’s just a hypothesis, but the Alberto Dell’Acqua look-alike who appears in a couple of scenes could be the fifth brother (named Luciano or Franco, for the moment there are two possibilities).

Curiously, the here uncredited actor who plays the 2nd Braddock brother was credited as Alfonso Sarlo in movies (for instance In the Name of the Father, the Son and the Colt) and Nando Sarlo in photonovels.

Master of arms on this one is Giuseppe Mattei, who plays the tallest of the Virginian brothers in the first Sabata movie.

In the English version, the credits erroneously give his name as “Bucaron Gerard.” He played small roles in Bertrand Blier’s Les Valseuses (1974) and in Damiano Damiani’s pseudo-remake Un genio, due compari, un pollo (1975).

Carmelo Reale is the bald henchman, called Chuck in the English dub.

From The Big Racket (1976):

I haven’t watched this film in over ten years and I can understand why. Quite a boring film unfortunately. I love the first movie though.

I found Dante Cona (see Reply #99) shaven in 1972 TV mini series Sorelle Materassi: from memory the gunsmith seems to me the only possibility, what do you think considering that height and build seem to be the same?

Maybe it’s the hair but I just can’t see it. He looks so much younger.


But I think the guy to his right is the postal inspector in The Stranger Returns.

In my opinion it’s not the same actor who plays the inspector.

I found Chiappa in a minor role, so the only possibilities among credited actors are Filippo Antonelli and Arnaldo Mangolini: considering that there’s a painter with the same name born in 1958 and since Arnaldo was credited in the Art Department in a 1976 comedy he could be the young cow herder who saves the Stranger.twice, but for the moment there isn’t a confirmation.

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I have finally completed my Sabata chronicles.

And I was kind of pleasently suprised with Return, given its reputation. Opening act is quite faboulous and spiritful, and so is the soundtrack: I love the campy main song and the fuzzy guitar that pierces the whole soundtrack (making it clear that this is 1971, not middle of the 60s when twang was the thing). I also like that they downplayed the sillines a little bit, compared to Adios Sabata. Some of the gadgets are actually more cool than ridicoulous. So, I would rate Return of Sabata close to Sabata and a lot higher than Adios Sabata.

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I would agree! I dont care for Adios but Return has a special place in my heart!

Another comparison between the gunsmith and Dante Cona