Licensing Spaghetti Western films


(Guanto) #1

Does anyone have any insight as to what exactly would be involved with legally being able to show Spaghetti Western films on a big screen for say a film festival, or obtaining broadcast rights for the small screen, for say a hosted spaghetti western movie show? Taking a critical look at something like the slapped together Mill Creek collection makes me think this may not be an unobtainable goal.


(autephex) #2

Well, the Mill Creek stuff is not legal, its just that nobody is going to bother with taking any action against them.

The same would probably apply to both scenarios you ask about, but if you want to do it legally then you need to first find out who owns the rights and then contact them about arrangements.

If you’re wanting to just discuss spaghetti westerns, I believe you can legally show clips from them without the rights, so long as you are commenting on the content and not showing the whole movies.


(Guanto) #3

No kidding on Mill Creek? Wow - I mean their multi-genre catalog is so massive it seems if even just a few of the production companies (or their estates) got together with some slimy ambulance chaser they could make a killing just because of the sheer number of licensing violations you could bang against their substantial distribution and sales. Are we sure lots of those films haven’t just defaulted or are an untraceable IP maybe? I dunno…

Anyway definitely referring to showing the whole movie “Svengoolie” style in my hypothesis.


(autephex) #4

I could be wrong but the assumption is that thesr are grey market unlicensed releases that just fly under the radar


(Guanto) #5

Well then the sheer quantity of “flying” astonishes me. Thanks for the insight.


(Yodlaf Peterson) #6

I think some Mill Creek stuff is licenced and some isn’t. i.e. the Sony and Crown stuff are at least.