For a Few Dollars More / Per qualche dollaro in più (Sergio Leone, 1965)

50th Anniversary FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE

Half a century ago, shortly before Christmas 1965, the second part in what is now called The Dollar trilogy saw the light

For the occasion I re-watched and re-studied the movie, its genesis and the history of some of its paraphernalia

Part I: For a Few dollars More - The Review

http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/For_a_Few_Dollars_More_Review

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Outstanding stuff, Scherp. You’re Lee Van Cleef to every other budding reviewer’s Clint Eastwood. :smile:

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Extraordinary stuff, as always Sherp.

He’s ruggedly handsome, that’s what he is.

“The strange thing about all this, is that Van Cleef was only five years older than Eastwood.”

-Wow, I’ve never noticed this. Weird.

I was as surprised as anybody else when I found out. Actually Sergio had seen Lee in High Noon and a couple of other movies and reckoned he would be in his late forties. Lee was forty when he made For a few Dollars More, Clint 35

The autobiographical bit from Giusti is really interesting

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Love this quote too:

Carlo, can you make an arena for me, with the stones around it positioned in a circle. It must be a circle.

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I prefer this one to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. It’s funny since this was always my least favourite of the Dollars trilogy until last year.

This film here is the finest example of what a spaghetti western should be, it has a fantastic score, an all star who’s who of the spaghetti genre, one of the best ending showdowns in a spaghetti, volonte and van cleef are at there finest here as well as Eastwood and even kinski has a great showdown with van cleef. I hold this spaghetti as the finest this genre has to offer along with good the bad and the ugly by a long shot.

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To diverge a bit, and coming from a rural background - I was curious about the original use of the Threshing Circle in the shootout at the end of this movie. Then I watched Trinity is still my Name the other night which shows the monks in the monastery using hand flails to separate the grain from the straw.

It seems the Threshing Circle was common in Spain with the community sharing the Circle and the work.
Horses have also been used in the Threshing Circle to perform the same task.
Online info tells me that the Threshing Circles were called “eras” in Spain, era coming from Latin for area which means open space used for building sites, threshing floors etc. (“eras de trigo” - areas of wheat).

For a few dollars more:
Forafewdollarsmore

Trinity is still my name:

Threshing without the Threshing Circle - Youtube video:

Both Trinity movies were entirely filmed in Italy: the Mazzano Romano location shown above, only a few kilometers from Monte Gelato waterfalls, was often modified and used from one time to the next as military base, Mexican village or, as in the case here, religious headquarter. Now is gone… nothing left but crops.

The movie is classic,especially the hat scene.


Oh,and this one is great too.

Simply overrated, No, that was a bad joke. 10/10.

Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef are the best actors as surviving gunmen,
Sergio Leone is the by far best SW director,
Almeria is the lovliest SW province,
the length of the film is suitable
and last but definitely not least Morricone is in top form.

Do you know the exact Trinity film location in Mazzano Romano by any chance.

Which blu-ray has the original mono soundtrack?

Found on Fistful-of-Leone.com’s message board: a very nice image-by-image reconstruction of the missing Eastwood-Krupp scene from Per qualche dollaro in più is provided here:

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Thank you for posting this. Always good to see photos from ‘FAFDM’ that I’ve never seen before.

The Kino Lorber does, not sure what kind of 2.0 mono tracks those on the Germany, Italy etc. editions are exactly. But the difference isn’t as “severe” as with GBU, as far as I know…

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