Boot Hill / La collina degli stivali (Giuseppe Colizzi, 1969)


(scherpschutter) #81

I know somebody who will be very happy with this review


(Dillinger) #82

Is the flick really that good? I didn’t like it much when I saw it like three years ago.
But I have to say, that this was rather in the beginning of my SW addiction, Maybe I would see it in a different way today…

There are many flicks from that period I should rewatch, Bandidos for example…


(Stanton) #83

I’m not sure if it was ahead of it’s time, and also if the directing is not on the Leone level (but there are not so much films which are anyway), indeed it’s one of the best directed and most stylish SWs.

But I like the music very much. The jazzy main themes and the circus music. Only a few symphonic motives are not that original, are even a bit odd in this film.

What the film lacks is a real great ending. It’s a good one(except for the brawl), but it’s not a fantastic one. An ending, may it be ironic or grim, but an ending which tops everything what was before. Then it would have been one of the very best.
Well, you can’t have everything.


(Stanton) #84

Well, it’s not SD


(Phil H) #85

Well not unless SD stands for Stanton Diabolik :wink:


(defocus) #86

My mother watched this tonight (it was on my laptop, so she decided to view it) and she thinks it was ‘a nice movie, not a lot of humour but a nice movie’. ;D

So, I like it…stanton likes it…my mother likes it…that makes it a good movie! 8)


(Dillinger) #87

[quote=“Stanton, post:83, topic:47”]What the film lacks is a real great ending. It’s a good one(except for the brawl), but it’s not a fantastic one. An ending, may it be ironic or grim, but an ending which tops everything what was before. Then it would have been one of the very best.
Well, you can’t have everything.[/quote]

I think that’s an important point.
A nice ending makes the flick stay in your mind.


(Bad Lieutenant) #88

It also lacks a great beginning and a great middle part.


(Dillinger) #89

That’s hard stuff, BL ;D


(Phil H) #90

Harsh but fair


(ENNIOO) #91

As my Dad used to say…" Son there is only so much you can do with crap".


(Dillinger) #92

He was a wise man.


(Stanton) #93

Let’s say in about 50 years, when Boot Hill is hailed as one of the best westerns ever, you will read this lines and say:
Look, look, this little fucker always knew it.


(Dillinger) #94

This will never happen…


(Chris_Casey) #95

Love that one, Ennioo!
And that sums up the way I feel about BOOT HILL, as well.
I do think that the film, at times, looks very nice; but, it just doesn’t work for me.
And I like BL’s comments, too!
;D


(Pacificador) #96

Brings to mind a couple other fitting quotes:

“You can’t make chicken salad out of chicken shit"
and
"You can’t polish a turd”


(ENNIOO) #97

;D .


(defocus) #98

You all just wait until Cristopher Frayling’s new book will be about the ‘undiscovered gem’ called Boots Hill! Only a matter of time ;D


(Chris_Casey) #99

You are right, amigo, it is only a matter of time. A matter of a LONG time! :smiley:

I have a question about the title of this film, folks. It is something that I have wondered about for quite awhile.
In the Old West a common slang for any town’s public cemetery was “Boot Hill” (not the plural Boots).
Hence, the title this film has for most English speaking markets: BOOT HILL.

However, the Italian title is “La collina degli stivali”–which literally means “The Hill of Boots”!
With that title, do you think Colizzi intentionally used a humorously poor translation in effort to show that he was having a little fun, Italian style, with conventions of the American West (not only the cinematic West but the true Old West)?
Or, was it just an error?
I tend to think Colizzi created the title on purpose, but maybe I am giving him too much credit.


(scherpschutter) #100

[quote=“Chris_Casey, post:99, topic:47”]You are right, amigo, it is only a matter of time. A matter of a LONG time! :smiley:

I have a question about the title of this film, folks. It is something that I have wondered about for quite awhile.
In the Old West a common slang for any town’s public cemetery was “Boot Hill” (not the plural Boots).
Hence, the title this film has for most English speaking markets: BOOT HILL.

However, the Italian title is “La collina degli stivali”–which literally means “The Hill of Boots”!
With that title, do you think Colizzi intentionally used a humorously poor translation in effort to show that he was having a little fun, Italian style, with conventions of the American West (not only the cinematic West but the true Old West)?
Or, was it just an error?
I tend to think Colizzi created the title on purpose, but maybe I am giving him too much credit.[/quote]

I think Colizzi chose ‘stivali’ instead of ‘stivale’ to avoid confusion: Lo Stivale, the boot, is a knickname for Italy. If you look at a map, you’ll notice the country has the shape of a very high boot. So La collina dello Stivale could be read as The Italian Hill

La Collina degli Stivali : literally ‘The hill of the boots’, degli = di (=of/from) + gli (the)
But I would translate this simply as Boot(s) Hill. In general, combinations like ‘Boot Hill’ or ‘football game’ (so of two nouns without any article of preposition) are impossible in Italian (It is possible with words like Casa or Stadio; usually those combinations are taken from Latin). Boot(s) Hill: La Collina degli Stivali, Football game : La partita di Calcio, but: Olympic Stadium : Stadio Olimpico